Vyala, Vyāla: 12 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vyala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vyāla (व्याल).—From the hairs of the head of Prajāpati. ety. ahi, the vilest of creatures; Pannaga. ety. creeping on the ground; sarpa, from escaping or fleeting nature; all have their abode in the earth under the sun and moon; out of anger came viṣa or poison; then airy beings were created; cūṭas, piśācas from eating flesh, Gandharvas sucking cows.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 9. 34-40.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Vyāla (व्याल).—Description of a women of tiger (vyāla) type;—A woman who takes honour and dishonour in the same spirit, has a rough skin and harsh voice, is wily, speaks untruth and haughty words, and has tawny eyes, is said to have the nature of a tiger (vyāla).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Vyāla (व्याल) refers to one of the eight kinds of daṇḍaka according to Kavikarṇapūra (C. 16th century) in his Vṛttamālā 61. Kavikarṇapūra was an exponent on Sanskrit metrics belongs to Kāmarūpa (modern Assam). Accordingly, “If there exist ten ra-s after two na-s, then it is Vyāla”.

2) Vyāla (व्याल) refers to one of the seventy-two sama-varṇavṛtta (regular syllabo-quantitative verse) mentioned in the 334th chapter of the Agnipurāṇa. The Agnipurāṇa deals with various subjects viz. literature, poetics, grammar, architecture in its 383 chapters and deals with the entire science of prosody (e.g., the vyāla metre) in 8 chapters (328-335) in 101 verses in total.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vyāla (व्याल).—m S A serpent.

--- OR ---

vyāḷa (व्याळ).—m (vyāla S) A serpent. Ex. jaisēṃ pāyāsa daṃśilēṃ mahā vyāḷēṃ || tōṃ mastakāsīṃ vṛścikēṃ daṃśilēṃ ||. 2 Applied popularly to the nāga or bhujaṅga.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vyāla (व्याल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—m A serpent.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vyāla (व्याल).—a.

1) Wicked, vicious; व्यालद्विपा यन्तृभिरुन्मदिष्णवः (vyāladvipā yantṛbhirunmadiṣṇavaḥ) Śi.12.28; यन्ता गजं व्यालमिवापराद्धः (yantā gajaṃ vyālamivāparāddhaḥ) Ki.17.25.

2) Bad, villainous.

3) Cruel, fierce, savage; जहति व्यालमृगाः परेषु वृत्तिम् (jahati vyālamṛgāḥ pareṣu vṛttim) Ki.13.4.

-laḥ 1 A vicious elephant; व्यालं बाल- मृणालतन्तुभिरसौ रोद्धुं समुज्जृम्भते (vyālaṃ bāla- mṛṇālatantubhirasau roddhuṃ samujjṛmbhate) Bh.2.6.

2) A beast of prey; वसन्त्यस्मिन् महारण्ये व्यालाश्च रुधिराशनाः (vasantyasmin mahāraṇye vyālāśca rudhirāśanāḥ) Rām.2.119. 19; वनं व्यालनिषेवितम् (vanaṃ vyālaniṣevitam) Rām.

3) A snake; H.3.29.

4) A tiger; Māl.3.

5) A leopard.

6) A king.

7) A cheat, rogue.

8) Name of Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāla (व्याल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Wicked, villainous, bad. 2. Cruel, fierce. m.

(-laḥ) 1. A snake. 2. A beast of prey. 3. A rogue, a cheat. 4. A vicious elephant. 5. A king. 6. A species of the Dandaka metre. E. vi and āṅ before al to adorn, aff. ac; or aḍ to make effort, aff. ghañ and ḍa changed to la; hence also vyāḍa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāla (व्याल).—I. adj. 1. Wicked, [Kirātārjunīya] 17, 25. 2. Cruel. Ii. m. 1. A snake, [Hitopadeśa] iii. [distich] 30. 2. A beast of prey, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 420. 3. A vicious elephant, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 6. 4. A rogue. 5. A king. Iii. f. , A female snake, Chr. 22, 22.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāla (व्याल).—[adjective] mischievous, malicious. [masculine] a malicious elephant, beast of prey, snake ([feminine] vyālī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vyāla (व्याल):—mfn. ([probably] connected with vyāḍa q.v.) mischievous, wicked, vicious, [Atharva-veda; Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

2) prodigal, extravagant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) m. (ifc. f(ā). ) a vicious elephant, [Kāvya literature]

4) m. a beast of prey, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) a snake, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

6) a lion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) a tiger, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) a hunting leopard, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) a prince, king, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Plumbago Ceylanica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) the second dṛkāṇa (q.v.) in Cancer, the first in Scorpio, and the third in Pisces, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

12) a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

13) Name of the number ‘eight’ [Gaṇitādhyāya]

14) Name of a man (cf. vyāḍa), [Catalogue(s)]

15) n. Name of one of the three retrograde stages in the motion of the planet Mars, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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