Vyada, Vyāḍa, Vyādā, Vyāḍā: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Vyada means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Vyāḍa (व्याड) refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Vyāḍa).

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Vyāḍā (व्याडा) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Vyāḍa forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Medinīcakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the medinīcakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Vyāḍā] and Vīras are yellow in color; the shapes of their faces are in accordance with their names; they have four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of vyada in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड).—

1) A carnivorous animal, such as a tiger.

2) A villain, rogue.

3) A snake.

4) Name of Indra; cf. व्याल (vyāla).

Derivable forms: vyāḍaḥ (व्याडः).

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Vyādā (व्यादा).—3 U.

1) To open, break open; न व्याददात्याननमत्र मृत्युः (na vyādadātyānanamatra mṛtyuḥ) Kirātārjunīya 16.16; नदी कूलं व्याददाति (nadī kūlaṃ vyādadāti), or व्यादते पिपीलिकाः पतङ्गस्य मुखम् (vyādate pipīlikāḥ pataṅgasya mukham) Mahābhārata

2) To make large, broaden.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड).—(1) m. (Sanskrit Gr. id., and in meaning wild beast in Sanskrit literature; = normal Sanskrit vyāla, Pali vāḷa), wild beast and serpent: both given by Tibetan, ma ruṅs pa, gdug pa, also sbrul, for Mahāvyutpatti 6962; serpent in Mahāvyutpatti 4841, = Tibetan klu, sbrul; vyāḍa-mṛga (= Sanskrit vyāla°, Pali vāḷamiga), wild beast, Mahāvastu ii.215.16 (siṃhena vyāghreṇa vā anyena vā vyāḍamṛgeṇa); 216.5; vaneṣu ca vyāḍamṛgākuleṣu Jātakamālā 122.18 (verse); (2) adj. (Sanskrit Lex. id., Sanskrit vyāla), violent, troublesome: Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya ii.8.13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड).—m.

(-ḍaḥ) 1. A snake. 2. A carnivorous animal or beast of prey. 3. Indra. 4. A villain, a rogue. E. vi and āṅ before aḍ to make effort, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड).—m. 1. A snake. 2. A beast of prey. 3. A rogue. 4. Indra (cf. vyāla).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड).—[masculine] beast of prey.

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Vyādā (व्यादा).—[Middle] (±mukham) open the mouth, gape.

Vyādā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vyā and (दा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vyaḍa (व्यड):—m. Name of a man, [Vopadeva] (cf. vyāḍi).

2) Vyāḍa (व्याड):—mfn. (said to be [from] 3. vi+-√aḍ; cf. vyāla) malicious, mischievous, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (with [locative case], [gana] śauṇḍādi)

3) m. a beast of prey, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

4) a snake, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) ‘a rogue’ or ‘a jackal’ (= vañcaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Name of Indra, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Vyādā (व्यादा):—[=vy-ā-√dā] [Parasmaipada] [Ātmanepada] -dadāti, -datte, to open wide, open ([especially] the mouth, with or [scilicet] mukham; [Ātmanepada], ‘to open the m° of another person, cause any one to open the m°’ [Siddhānta-kaumudī]), [Chāndogya-upaniṣad; Mahābhārata etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyāḍa (व्याड):—(ḍaḥ) 1. m. A snake; beast of prey; Indra; a rogue.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vyāda (व्याद) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Vāya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vyada in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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