Vrishya, Vṛṣya: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vrishya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Vṛṣya can be transliterated into English as Vrsya or Vrishya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Vṛṣya (वृष्य, “aphrodisiac”) is a Sanskrit technical term used throughout Rasaśāstra literature, such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

1) Vṛṣya (वृष्य) refers to “viriligenic”, and is mentioned in verse 2.15 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Vṛṣya (“viriligenic”), āyuṣya (“vitalizing”), and ūrjābalaprada (“generative of vigour and strength”) have been combined to rotsa daṅ thse daṅ mdaṅs daṅ stobs rah (b)skyed (“generates virility, life, vigour, and strength”).

2) Vṛṣya (वृष्य) refers to “aphrodisiacs”, as mentioned in verse 4.28 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā .—Accordingly, “[...] he who knows the right time (for administering remedies) shall thereafter apply perfect elixirs and aphrodisiac preparations [viz., vṛṣya-yoga] according to the (prescribed) order (and the attendant) circumstances”.

Note: vṛṣya-yoga, lit. (“a preparation productive of sexual vigour”), has been turned ro-tsai sbyor-ba, lit. “a preparation for sexual desire”. The cognate accusative has for once been retained in Tibetan.

Source: Research Gate: Internal applications of Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox wall)

Vṛṣya (वृष्य) refers to “aphrodisiac”. Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized as sthāvara-viṣa (vegetable poisons), has been extensively used in ayurvedic pharmacopoeia.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Vṛṣya (वृष्य) refers to “aphrodisiac” and represents a particular dietetic effect according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Accordingly, the dietetic effect vṛṣya is associated with the following conditions: Food utensils made of Rambhāpatra (plantain leaf), Kumudapatra (white water-lilly leaf), Raktotpalapatra (red lotus leaf) or Utpalapatra (blue lotus leaf).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vṛṣya (वृष्य).—a.

1) To be rained or showered down.

2) Stimulating amorous desire, provocative of sexual vigour, aphrodisiac.

-ṣyaḥ A kind of kidney-bean.

-ṣyam Stimulating amorous desires (vājīkaraṇam).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vṛṣya (वृष्य).—mfn.

(-ṣyaḥ-ṣyā-ṣyaṃ) 1. Errhine, aphrodisiac, provocative, (food or medicine.) 2. Provocative of sexual vigour. 3. To be sprinkled or aspersed. m.

(-ṣyaḥ) Kidney-bean, (Phaseolus radiatus.) f.

(-ṣyā) A drug, commonly Rid'dhi. E. vṛṣ to sprinkle, aff. kyap .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vṛṣya (वृष्य).—[adjective] causing manliness; [masculine] [Epithet] of Śiva, [neuter] an aphrodisiac.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vṛṣya (वृष्य):—[from vṛṣ] mfn. = varṣya, [Pāṇini 3-1, 120]

2) [v.s. ...] productive of sexual vigour, stimulating, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Śiva, [Mahābhārata 10372] ([Nīlakaṇṭha] ‘increasing merit’; rather ‘most manly or vigorous’)

4) [v.s. ...] Phaseolus Radiatus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Vṛṣyā (वृष्या):—[from vṛṣya > vṛṣ] f. Asparagus Racemosus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] the myrobalan-tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of bulbous plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Vṛṣya (वृष्य):—[from vṛṣ] n. an aphrodisiac, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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