Vishalya, Viśalyā, Viśalya: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Vishalya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Viśalyā and Viśalya can be transliterated into English as Visalya or Vishalya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vishalya in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Viśalyā (विशल्या).—A river famous in the Purāṇas. Mention is made in Mahābhārata, Sabhā Parva, Chapter 9, Stanza 20, that this river stays in the Palace of Varuṇa glorifying him. This is a holy river. One could obtain the fruits of Agniṣṭoma Yajña (a sacrifice) by taking a bath in this river.

2) Viśalya (विशल्य).—A medicine. This medicine is used to extricate the arrow-heads that might have stuck on the body. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 289, Stanza 6)

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Vishalya [विशल्या] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Tinospora cordifolia from the Menispermaceae (Moonseed) family. For the possible medicinal usage of vishalya, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Vishalya [विशल्य] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Baliospermum solanifolium (Burm.) Suresh from the Euphorbiaceae (Castor) family having the following synonyms: Baliospermum axillare, Baliospermum montanum, Jatropha montana.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Viśalyā (विशल्या) is another name for Guḍūcī, a medicinal plant identified with Tinospora cordifolia (heart-leaved moonseed) from the Menispermaceae or “moonseed family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.13-16 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Viśalyā and Guḍūcī, there are a total of thirty Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Viśalyā (विशल्या) is also mentioned as a synonym for Kalikārī, a medicinal plant identified with Gloriosa superba Linn. (‘flame lily’) from the Colchicaceae family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.128-130. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Viśalyā and Kalikārī, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Viśalyā (विशल्या) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Gloriosa superba Linn.” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning viśalyā] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Viśalya (विशल्य) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Viśalya] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Viśalya (विशल्य).—a.

1) Free from trouble or anxiety, secure.

2) Free from thorns or darts; विशल्यौ चापि सुग्रीवः क्षणेनैतौ चकार ह । विशल्यया महौषध्या दिव्यमन्त्रप्रयुक्तया (viśalyau cāpi sugrīvaḥ kṣaṇenaitau cakāra ha | viśalyayā mahauṣadhyā divyamantraprayuktayā) || Mahābhārata (Bombay) 3.289.6.

-lyā Name of several plants :-दन्ती, गुडूची, अजमोदा (dantī, guḍūcī, ajamodā) &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Viśalya (विशल्य).—mfn.

(-lyaḥ-lyā-lyaṃ) 1. Free from thorns or spikes. 2. Free from care or pain. f.

(-lyā) 1. A twining shrub, (Menispermum cordi folium.) 2. A sort of potherb, (the kind not ascertained.) 3. A plant, commonly Danti, (Croton polyandrum.) 4. Another plant, commonly Teori, (Convolvulus turpethum.) 5. A sort of fruit, Langaliya. E. vi privative, and śalya a stalk or stem.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Viśalya (विशल्य).—adj. 1. free from thorns or spikes, [Rāmāyaṇa] 6, 71, 24. 2. free from pain or care.

Viśalya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vi and śalya (शल्य).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Viśalya (विशल्य).—[adjective] having no point (arrow); having no (arrow-) point or wound, i.e. free from pain, [Name] of a man.

--- OR ---

Visalya (विसल्य).—[masculine] a cert. disease.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Viśalya (विशल्य):—[=vi-śalya] [from vi] a See sub voce

2) Visalya (विसल्य):—[=vi-salya] [from vi] a m. a [particular] disease, [Atharva-veda]

3) Viśalya (विशल्य):—[=vi-śalya] b mfn. pointless (as an arrow), [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

4) [v.s. ...] freed from an arrow-head, healed of an arrow-wound, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] free from thorns or darts, [Horace H. Wilson]

6) [v.s. ...] freed from an extraneous substance in the body (ā viśalya-bhāvāt, ‘until freed from the embryo’), [Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] freed from pain, [Mahābhārata]

8) [v.s. ...] without trouble or care or pain, [Horace H. Wilson]

9) Viśalyā (विशल्या):—[=vi-śalyā] [from vi-śalya] f. Name of various plants (also of a specific for arrow-wounds), [Suśruta; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

10) [v.s. ...] Cocculus Cordifolius, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Croton Polyandrum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] Convolvulus Turpethum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] Methonica Superba, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

14) [v.s. ...] = agni-śikhā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] = aja-modā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] Menispermum Cordifolium, [Horace H. Wilson]

17) [v.s. ...] a sort of pot-herb, [ib.]

18) [v.s. ...] a sort of fruit, Langaliya, [ib.]

19) [v.s. ...] Name of the wife of Lakṣmaṇa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

20) [v.s. ...] of a river, [Mahābhārata]

21) Visalya (विसल्य):—[=vi-salya] b vi-sāmagrī, vi-sārathi etc. See p. 953, col. 1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Viśalyā (विशल्या):—[vi-śalyā] (lyā) 1. f. Name of several plants. a. Free from thorns or cares.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Viśalya (विशल्य) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Visalla, Visallā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vishalya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Viśalya (ವಿಶಲ್ಯ):—

1) [adjective] (said of plants) not having thorns; thornless.

2) [adjective] free from pain, agony, misery, etc.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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