Viravara, aka: Vīravara; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Viravara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Viravara in Katha glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

Vīravara (वीरवर) is the name of a Brāhman from the Mālava country, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 53. Accordingly, “... once on a time a heroic and handsome Brāhman, from the country of Mālava, named Vīravara, came there to take service under that king [Vikramatuṅga]. He had a wife named Dharmavatī, a daughter named Vīravatī, and a son named Sattvavara; these three constituted his family; and his attendants consisted of another three: at his hip a dagger, in one hand a sword, and in the other a polished shield. ”.

Vīravara (वीरवर) is also mentioned in the fourth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 78. Accordingly, “... once on a time a Brāhman of the name of Vīravara came from Mālava to take service under that king [Śūdraka] who loved heroes. His wife’s name was Dharmavatī, his son was Sattvavara, and his daughter was Vīravatī. These three composed his family; and his attendants were another three: at his side a dagger, a sword in one hand, and a splendid shield in the other”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Vīravara, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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