Virasa: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Virasa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Virasa (विरस).—A nāga (serpent) born in the family of Prajāpati Kaśyapa. (Mahābhārata Udyoga Parva, Chapter 103, Stanza 16).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Virasa (विरस) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. V.101.16/V.103) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Virasa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Virasa (विरस):—[virasaṃ] Distaste

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

virasa (विरस).—a (vi & rasa Juice.) Wanting juice, succulence, or sappiness--a fruit, a plant. 2 Dry, flat, jejune, vapid, spiritless--speech: unenergetic, nerveless, lifeless--action : that has lost or is without animation, vigor, spirit, mettle, pluck--a person.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

virasa (विरस).—a Wanting juice; dry. Spiritless.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Virasa (विरस).—a.

1) Tasteless, insipid, flavourless.

2) Unpleasant, disagreeable, painful; तावत् कोकिल विरसान् यापय दिवसान् वनान्तरे निवसन् (tāvat kokila virasān yāpaya divasān vanāntare nivasan) Bv.1.7; Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 1.31;6.1.

3) Cruel, unfeeling.

-saḥ Pain.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Virasa (विरस).—mfn.

(-saḥ-sā-saṃ) 1. Insipid. 2. Painful. m.

(-saḥ) Pain. E. vi, rasa flavour.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Virasa (विरस).—I. adj. 1. insipid. 2. painful, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 157, 6. Ii. m. pain, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 18, 9.

Virasa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vi and rasa (रस).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Virasa (विरस).—[adjective] juiceless, flavourless, insipid, disgusting, repugnant; [neuter] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Virasa (विरस):—[=vi-rasa] [from vi] a mfn. juiceless, sapless, unseasoned, [Āpastamba]

2) [v.s. ...] flavourless, tasteless, insipid ([literally] and [figuratively]), unpleasant, disagreeable, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] painful, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

4) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) having no taste for, [Manvarthamuktāvalī, kullūka bhaṭṭa’s Commentary on manu-smṛti on Manu-smṛti ii, 95]

5) [v.s. ...] m. pain, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a serpent-demon, [Mahābhārata]

7) [=vi-rasa] b etc. See p. 952, col. 1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Virasa (विरस):—[vi-rasa] (saḥ-sā-saṃ) a. Insipid.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Virasa (विरस) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Virasa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Virasa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Virasa (विरस) [Also spelled viras]:—(a) tasteless; insipid; juiceless; boring; ~[] insipidity, tastelessness; rancidity.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Virasa (विरस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Viras.

2) Virasa (विरस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Virasa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Virasa (ವಿರಸ):—

1) [adjective] without sap; withered; dry.

2) [adjective] deprived of essence.

3) [adjective] not interesting; boring.

4) [adjective] not tasty or tasting bad.

5) [adjective] lacking kindness or feeling; hard and pitiless.

--- OR ---

Virasa (ವಿರಸ):—

1) [noun] that which is useless or worthless.

2) [noun] strained relation; unfriendliness; hostility.

3) [noun] lack of harmony or agreement; incongruity.

4) [noun] a feeling of not liking; distaste; aversion; dislike.

5) [noun] a man who is unfriendly, hostile or lacking kindness or feeling; a cruel, pitiless man.

6) [noun] (rhet.) in a literary work, quality of being not interesting; a dull, boring style.

7) [noun] a singer whose singing does not arouse the sentiments in or is boring to listeners.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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