Vinda: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vinda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Vinda (विन्द).—One of the hundred sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. It is mentioned in Mahābhārata, Droṇa Parva, Chapter 127, Stanza 34, that Vinda was killed by Bhīmasena in the battle of Bhārata.

2) Vinda (विन्द).—A prince of Avantī. It is stated that this Vinda had a brother called Anuvinda. The information obtained about Vinda from Mahābhārata is given below:

2) (i) Sahadeva defeated this Vinda at the time of his southern regional conquest. (Mahābhārata Sabhā Parva, Chapter 31, Stanza 10).

2) (ii) Vinda helped Duryodhana by fighting on his side with an akṣauhiṇī of army. (Mahābhārata Udyoga Parva, Chapter 19, Stanza 24).

2) (iii) Bhīṣma once said that Vinda was a noble warrior. (Mahābhārata Udyoga Parva, Chapter 166, Stanza 6).

2) (iv) Vinda was one of the ten commanders of Duryodhana in the battle of Bhārata. (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 16, Stanza 15).

2) (v) On the first day of the battle of Bhārata, Vinda fought with Kuntibhoja. (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 45, Stanza 72).

2) (vi) When Śveta, the prince of Virāṭa, surrounded Śalya, the King of Madra, Vinda helped Śalya. (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 47, Stanza 48).

2) (vii) Once Vinda and his brother Anuvinda together attacked Irāvān. (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 81, Stanza 27).

2) (viii) In the Bhārata-battle, Vinda fought with Bhīmasena, Arjuna and Virāṭa. Vinda was killed in the fight with Arjuna. (Mahābhārata Droṇa Parva, Chapter 99, Stanza 17).

3) Vinda (विन्द).—A prince of the kingdom of Kekaya. In the battle of Bhārata he took the side of the Kauravas and fought with Sātyaki, in which fight Sātyaki killed Vinda. (Mahābhārata Karṇa Parva, Chapter 13, Stanza 6).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vinda (विन्द).—A prince of Avanti, a son of Rājādhidevī and brother of Anuvinda;1 under the influence of Duryodhana (as also Anuvinda) the brothers wanted to give their sister in marriage to Duryodhana, and not to Kṛṣṇa whom she loved: stationed by Jarāsandha at the southern gate of Mathurā and Gomanta during their respective sieges.2

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 157; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 14. 43.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 58. 30; 50. 11[3]; 52. 11[9]; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 158.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Vinda (विन्द) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.108.3) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vinda) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Vinda (विन्द).—A prince of Avanti. He was the bother of Mitravindā, a queen of Lord Kṛṣṇa. He was very envious of Lord Kṛṣṇa and Arjuna. He was killed along with his brother Anuvinda during the Kurukṣetra war. Both brothers were killed by Arjuna.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Vinda was the prince of Avanti. Along with his brother Anuvinda, he fought on the Kaurava side during the great battle of Kurukshetra. Both of them achieved many great feats of bravery on the battlefield. Anuvinda was first to fall, slain by Satyaki of the Vrishnis. Enraged, Vinda challenged Satyaki to single combat, but proved to be no match for the Vrishni hero, and was soon slain himself.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Vinda (विन्‍द), Anuvinda (अनुविन्‍द): Two brothers kings of Avanti, great soldiers whom were on the Kaurava side, they suffered defeat at the hands of Yudhamanyu.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vinda (विन्द).—a.

1) Finding, gaining.

2) One who has obtained; त्रैलोक्येनापि विन्दस्त्वं तां क्रीत्वा सुकृती भव (trailokyenāpi vindastvaṃ tāṃ krītvā sukṛtī bhava) Bk.5.21.

-ndaḥ A particular hour of the day (muhūrta); विन्दो नाम मुहूर्तोऽसौ (vindo nāma muhūrto'sau) Rām.3.68.13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Viṇḍa (विण्ड).—(probably only m.c.) and viṇḍaka (nt. in (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 57.7 kuśa-°kaṃ, n. sg.; probably MIndic for Sanskrit piṇḍa, °ka which replaces it in kuśapiṇḍakopaviṣṭa (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 47.5; compare however AMg. viṇṭiā, bundle, and Sanskrit vṛnda, see s.v. vṛndi), grass-cushion, used as a seat: viṇḍake masūrikā- yāṃ (q.v.) vā niṣadya Bhikṣuṇī-karmavācanā 19a.1; otherwise only in composition, preceded by kuśa (rarely darbha), and only in (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: kuśaviṇḍakaṃ (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 57.7; °viṇḍakopaviṣṭa, sitting on…, (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 37.28; 39.21; 47.18; 57.4 (°ṣṭikāṃ); 61.20; 74.26, etc., common; °ḍaka-śiropadhāna- 146.2; kuśaviṇḍe pallave caiva…upaviṣṭaḥ 488.13 (hypermetric!); darbhaviṇḍopaviṣṭas tu (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 137.8 (verse).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vinda (विन्द).—mfn.

(-ndaḥ-ndā-ndaṃ) Who or what finds, gets, gains, &c. E. vid to gain, śa aff., nun augment.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vinda (विन्द).—[adjective] finding, winning (—°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vinda (विन्द):—[from vind] mfn. finding, getting, gaining (ifc.; See go-, cāru-v etc.)

2) [v.s. ...] m. a [particular] hour of the day, [Rāmāyaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a son of Dhṛta-rāṣṭra, [Mahābhārata]

4) [v.s. ...] of a king of Avanti, [ib.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vinda (विन्द):—[(ndaḥ-ndā-ndaṃ) a.] Getting.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Vinda (विन्द):—(von vind)

1) adj. findend, gewinnend [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 3, 1, 138.] [Vopadeva’s Grammatik 26, 35.] Vgl. go, cāru, bhadra, mitra, vatsa . —

2) m. a) Bez. einer best. Stunde des Tages [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 73, 16 (68, 13 ed. Bomb. ).] — b) Nomen proprium neben anuvinda, Söhne Dhṛtarāṣṭra’s [Mahābhārata 1, 2729. 4543.] Fürsten von Avanti [?2, 1114. 5, 2503. 7, 3691 (vgl. 3682). Harivaṃśa 5016. 5497. 8020. 8099.] Söhne Jayasena's [Viṣṇupurāṇa 437.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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