Vinasha, Vināśa, Vinasa, Vināsa: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Vinasha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Vināśa can be transliterated into English as Vinasa or Vinasha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Vināśa (विनाश).—Disappearance, elision; the word is frequently used in the sense of lopa; cf. एतच्च नित्येषु शब्देषु नेपपद्यते यस्सतो नाम विनाशः स्यादसतो वा प्रादुर्भावः (etacca nityeṣu śabdeṣu nepapadyate yassato nāma vināśaḥ syādasato vā prādurbhāvaḥ) M.Bh. on P. I.1.56 Vart.12.

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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Vināśa (विनाश):—[vināśaḥ] Demolition or dying out

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Vināśa (विनाश) refers to the “death” (i.e., of a reigning prince), according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. [...] A single spot will bring on famine; if two or more spots should appear, the reigning prince will die [i.e., vināśanarapatervināśāy]; if they should appear white, red, yellow or black then the Brāhmaṇas, the Kṣatriyas, the Vaiśyas or the Śūdras will suffer respectively. Only those parts of the earth will suffer in the corresponding parts of which on the solar disc the spots happen to appear”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Vināśa (विनाश) refers to “destruction” and as one of the weapons (attributes) of Goddess Kubjikā symbolizes “the avoidance of obstacles”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Now) I will tell (you about) the great weapons of that (goddess) Kubjikā. [...] (One) attains (ultimate) reality by means of the trident and Māyā is destroyed by means of the wheel. All diseases are destroyed by the thunderbolt while the goad is considered to be (the means to attract and) control. The enemy is destroyed [i.e., śatru-vināśa] by the arrow. The dagger is the avoidance of obstacles. Wealth is acquired by means of the severed head and the eight yogic powers by the ascetic’s staff”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Vināśa (विनाश) refers to the “destruction (of views)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Son of good family, there are eight patiences reflecting on the dharma of the Bodhisattvas. What are the eight? (1) the patience of emptiness since there is no destruction (vināśa) of views; (2) the patience of signlessness since signs are not excluded; (3) the patience of wishlessness since there is no wish in awakening; (4) the patience of the unconditioned since there is no destruction of conditioned things; [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Vināśa (विनाश) refers to “decay”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “You must understand that the body is overcome by disease, youth is overcome by old age, vitality is oppressed by decay (vināśa-ārta) and life is oppressed by death”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Vināśa.—(LP), ‘not doing anything at all’. Note: vināśa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vinasha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vināsa : (m.) destruction; ruin; loss.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vināsa, (vi+nāsa, of naś) destruction, ruin, loss D. I, 34 (+uccheda & vibhava), 55; Pv. II, 710; Vism. 427 (so read for vinasa); DA. I, 120; PvA. 102 (dhana°), 133. (Page 624)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vināśa (विनाश).—m (S) Annihilation, extinction, destruction, perdition; cessation or loss of being.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vināśa (विनाश).—m Annihilation, extinction.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vināśa (विनाश).—

1) Destruction, ruin, utter loss, decay.

2) Removal.

3) Death.

4) The perishable world; संभूतिं च विनाशं च यस्तद्वेदोभयं सह (saṃbhūtiṃ ca vināśaṃ ca yastadvedobhayaṃ saha) Īśop.14 (it is called kāryabrahma).

Derivable forms: vināśaḥ (विनाशः).

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Vinasa (विनस).—a. (-sā, -sī f.) Noseless; यद्यहं नाथ नायास्यं विनासा हतबान्धवा (yadyahaṃ nātha nāyāsyaṃ vināsā hatabāndhavā) Bhaṭṭikāvya 5.8.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vinasa (विनस).—mfn.

(-saḥ-sā or sī-saṃ) Noseless. E. vi priv., nas for nāsikā the nose.

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Vināśa (विनाश).—m.

(-śaḥ) 1. Disappearance, destruction, loss, annihilation, ruin, decay. 2. Removal. E. vi before, naś to perish, aff. ghañ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vināśa (विनाश).—i. e. vi-naś + a, m. 1. Perdition, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 179; ruin, destruction, [Pañcatantra] 162, 12; death, [Pañcatantra] 175, 3; 184, 9 (with upa yā, To die). 2. Removal, [Pañcatantra] 187, 7; disappearance; with abhi-i, To disappear, [Pañcatantra] v. [distich] 66. 3. Loss, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 85; [Pañcatantra] 145, 15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vinasa (विनस).—[adjective] robbed of the nose.

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Vināśa (विनाश).—[masculine] perdition, destruction, ruin, disappearance, loss.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vinasa (विनस):—[=vi-nasa] [from vi] mf(ā)n. without a nose, noseless, [Bhaṭṭi-kāvya]

2) Vināsa (विनास):—[=vi-nāsa] [from vi] mf(ā)n. noseless, [Agni-purāṇa]

3) Vināśa (विनाश):—[=vi-nāśa] [from vi-naś] m. utter loss, annihilation, perdition, destruction, decay, death, removal, [Taittirīya-prātiśākhya; Upaniṣad; Mahābhārata] etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vinasa (विनस):—[vi-nasa] (saḥ-sā-saṃ) a. Noseless.

2) Vināśa (विनाश):—[vi-nāśa] (śaḥ) 1. m. Disappearance, destruction, loss.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vināśa (विनाश) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Viuḍa, Viṇāsa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vinasha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vinasha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vināśa (विनाश) [Also spelled vinash]:—(nm) destruction, devastation; disaster, ruin, wreck; ~[ka] destroyer/destructive, devastating/one who devastates or ruins; ~[dharmī] perishable, transient, transitory; -[hetu] the cause for destruction/devastation; ~[kāle] [viparīta buddhi] whom God would destory, He first makes mad.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Viṇāsa (विणास) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Vināśa.

2) Viṇāsa (विणास) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Vināśa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vināśa (ವಿನಾಶ):—

1) [noun] a complete destruction; obliteration; annihilation.

2) [noun] the act or an instance of going out of sight; disappearance.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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