Vilaya, Vilāya: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Vilaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Vilay.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Vilaya (विलय) means “to dissolve”, according to Arṇasiṃha’s Mahānayaprakāśa verse 134.—Accordingly, “The Śāmbhava (state) is the one in which the power of consciousness (citi) suddenly (sahasā) dissolves [i.e., vilaya] away into the Great Void called the Inactive that is profound and has no abode. Cognitive awareness (jñāna) arises here in the form of a subtle wave of consciousness out of that ocean of emptiness, which is the perfectly peaceful condition of the dissolving away of destruction. [...] Again, that same (principle) free of the cognitive process is the supreme absolute said to be the Śāmbhava state of emptiness”.

2) Vilaya (विलय) refers to the “dissolving” (of the universe), according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Akula is said to be the principle that, self-existent, does not require Kula in order to exist. It is Śiva, the supreme cause. Kula is that from which the universe arises. It is that in which it is established and where it is dissolved away (vilayaviśvasya vilayo yatra). That Kula is said to be Kaula”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Vilaya (विलय) refers to the “dissolution of the world”, according to the Mṛgendrāgama Kriyāpāda verse 8.6-7.—Accordingly, “The śivadharmiṇī [initiation] is the root of success for the fruits of the Śaiva religion for the individual soul. There is another [kind of śivadharmiṇī] taught without the destruction of the body, up until the dissolution of the world (vilaya). The remaining one is taught to be the lokadharmiṇī, for the purpose of [attaining the eight-fold supernatural powers] starting with aṇimā after the current life, after all the bad portions [of karma] were destroyed at all reality levels”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Vilaya (विलय) refers to “destruction”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [as the Bhagavān teaches the offering of the root spell], “[...] After [the (pomegranate) branch] has been circled wrathfully 108 times, all neighbouring clouds and Nāgas with their retinues fall onto the ground. [...] If the spell-master recites the mantras swiftly, there will be family insanity for all of them. They will perish along with their sons and grandsons, assemblies and vehicles. They will be destroyed (vilaya). [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Vilaya (विलय) refers to “destruction”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “This cosmos must be thought of as filled with a multitude of objects exceedingly firmly embraced by the maintenance of life, birth and death in the middle of the rings of wind, complete in this world of its own accord, accomplished without a beginning, ancient [and] free from creation and destruction (kṛti-vilaya-vihīna). [Thus ends the reflection on] the cosmos”.

Synonyms: Vinaṣṭa, Vigama, Viccheda, Nāśa.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vilaya : (m.) dissolution.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vilaya, (vi+laya, cp. līyati) dissolution; °ṃ gacchati, as much as: “to be digested, ” to be dissolved Miln. 67. ‹-› adj. dissolved, dispersed Dpvs. I, 65. (Page 635)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vilaya (विलय).—m S Destruction; esp. that of extinction or annihilation. vilayā jāṇēṃ To go to destruction; to be dissipated, extinguished, ended. Ex. jaisīṃ sītakāḷīṃ abhrēṃ samasta || vilayā jāti ākāśīṃ ||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vilaya (विलय).—m Destruction. vilayā jāṇēṃ Go to destruction.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vilaya (विलय).—

1) Dissolution, liquefaction.

2) Destruction, death, end; नयतु मामात्मनोऽङ्गेषु विलयमम्बा (nayatu māmātmano'ṅgeṣu vilayamambā) Uttararāmacarita 7.

3) Destruction or dissolution of the world; (vilayaṃ gam to be dissolved, to end, to be terminated; divaso'numitramagamadvilayam Śiśupālavadha 9.17).

Derivable forms: vilayaḥ (विलयः).

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Vilāya (विलाय).—Dissolution, destruction, end; परीक्षितोऽथ राजर्षेर्जन्मकर्मविलायनम् (parīkṣito'tha rājarṣerjanmakarmavilāyanam) Bhāgavata 1.7.12.

Derivable forms: vilāyaḥ (विलायः).

See also (synonyms): vilāyana.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vilaya (विलय).—m.

(-yaḥ) 1. Destruction of the world. 2. Destruction in general. 3. Liquefaction. E. vi before to liquefy, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vilaya (विलय).—i. e. vi-lī + a, m. 1. Liquefaction, [Śiśupālavadha] 9, 17; vilayaṃ gam, To be dissolved, to end. 2. Death, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 172, 3. 3. Destruction, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 77. 4. Destruction of the world.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vilaya (विलय).—[masculine] dissolution, destruction, disappearance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vilaya (विलय):—[=vi-laya] a etc. See vi-√lī, [column]3.

2) [=vi-laya] [from vi-lī] b m. dissolution, liquefaction, disappearance, death, destruction ([especially] d° of the world), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature etc.] ([accusative] with √gam, , vraj etc. to be dissolved, end; with [Causal] of √gam, to dissolve, destroy)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vilaya (विलय):—[vi-laya] (yaḥ) 1. m. Dissolution; destruction of the world.

2) Vilāya (विलाय):—(yaḥ) 1. m. Destruction.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vilaya (विलय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Vilaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vilaya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vilaya (विलय) [Also spelled vilay]:—(nm) annihilation/destruction (of the world); dissolution/dissolving; merger/merging; ~[yana] a solution; dissolution, merger; absorption; ~[yaśīla] soluble, solute; ~[yaśīlatā] solubility; ~[] soluble, that which dissolves.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Vilaya (विलय) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Vilaya.

2) Vilayā (विलया) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Vanitā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vilaya (ವಿಲಯ):—

1) [noun] dissolution; liquefication.

2) [noun] complete destruction of the universe.

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Viḷaya (ವಿಳಯ):—

1) [noun] dissolution; liquefication.

2) [noun] complete destruction of the universe.

--- OR ---

Vīḷaya (ವೀಳಯ):—[noun] = ವೀಳೆಯ [vileya].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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