Vilasini, aka: Vilāsinī; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vilasini means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Vilasini in Purana glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the name of a river mentioned in a list of rivers, flowing from the five great mountains (Śailavarṇa, Mālākhya, Korajaska, Triparṇa and Nīla), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 82. Those who drink the waters of these rivers live for ten thousand years and become devotees of Rudra and Umā.

One of the five mountains situated near Bhadrāśva, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 82. The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, instructions for religious ceremonies and a whole range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The original text is said to have been composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Vilasini in Chandas glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

1) Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Vilāsinī corresponds to Jayā (according to Barata). Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

2) Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (eg., Vilāsinī) in 20 verses.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Vilasini in Katha glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

1) Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the daughter of Vīrabhaṭa, an ancient king of Tāmraliptī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 44. Accordingly, as Vajraprabha said to Naravāhanadatta: “... and he [Sūryaprabha] came back to Tāmraliptī and there carried off again another maiden princess, by name Vilāsinī. And when her haughty brother Sahasrāyudha was annoyed at it he paralysed him by his supernatural power”.

2) Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the daughter of Sumeru, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 46. Accordingly, as her friend said to Sūryaprabha, “... this is a maiden named Vilāsinī, the daughter of Sumeru, the Prince of the Vidyādharas, who was desirous of beholding you”.

The story of Vilāsinī was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Vilāsinī, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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India history and geogprahy

Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the name of a river mentioned in the Gupta inscription No. 14. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The river Vilāsinī comes out from the mountain Raivataka. Fleet takes Sikatāvilāsinī as an adjective of the Palāśinī but the three, Sikatā, Vilāsinī and Palāśinī seem to be separate rivers as we find the use of the plural number in the case which denotes the mention of more than two rivers. Hence Vilāsinī is the third river in the context: the other two being Pilāśinī and Sikatā (Suvarṇasikatā).

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Vilāsinī (विलासिनी) is the name of a commentary on Kṛṣṇavilāsa of Sukumāra ascribed to Rāmapāṇivāda (18th Century): a scholar of multi discipline, who flourished in Kerala in the 18th Century. He was a prolific writer both in Sanskrit and Prakrit. Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XXIV. pp. 173-74.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Vilāsinī.—(EI 33), same as Devadāsī; also called Gaṇikā, etc. Note: vilāsinī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Vilasini in Pali glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

vilāsinī : (f.) a woman.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vilasini in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

Vilāsinī (विलासिनी).—

1) A woman (in general).

2) A coquettish or wanton woman; हरिरिह मुग्धवधूनिकरे विलासिनि विलसति केलिपरे (haririha mugdhavadhūnikare vilāsini vilasati kelipare) Gīt.1; Ku.7.69; Śi.8.5; R.6.17.

3) A wanton, harlot.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 23 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Varavilasini
Vāravilāsinī (वारविलासिनी).—f. (-nī) A harlot, a whore. E. vāra a multitude, vilāsinī a wanton.
Hattavilasini
Haṭṭavilāsinī (हट्टविलासिनी).—1) a wanton woman, prostitute, common woman. 2) a sort of perfume...
Raja-vilasini
Rāja-vilāsinī.—king's courtesan (Ep. Ind., Vol. XXXV, p. 107). Note: rāja-vilāsinī is defined i...
Taruvilasini
Taruvilāsinī (तरुविलासिनी).—the Navamallikā creeper. Taruvilāsinī is a Sanskrit compound consis...
Varnavilasini
Varṇavilāsinī (वर्णविलासिनी).—turmeric. Varṇavilāsinī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the ...
Panyavilasini
Paṇyavilāsinī (पण्यविलासिनी).—f. a harlot, a courtezan; पण्यस्त्रीषु विवेककल्पलतिकाशस्त्रीषु रज...
Vanavilasini
Vanavilāsinī (वनविलासिनी) is another name for Śaṅkhapuṣpī, a medicinal plant identified with Co...
Kamalavilasini
Kamalavilāsinī (कमलविलासिनी) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) to which Hemacandra (108...
Jaya
Jaya (जय).—m. (-yaḥ) 1. Conquest, victory, triumph. 2. A name of YuDhish- T'Hira. 3. A proper n...
Apadana
Apadāna.—cf. dharm-āpadāna (CII 1); a noble deed. Note: apadāna is defined in the “Indian epigr...
Vadhu
Vadhu (वधु).—f. (-dhuḥ) 1. A son’s wife. 2. A wife in general. vah to bear, u aff.; more common...
Kelii
Keli (केलि).—m. f. [kel-in]1) Play, sport.2) Amorous sport, pastime; केलिचलन्मणिकुण्डल (kelical...
Patimokkha
1) Pātimokkha, see pāṭi°. (Page 452)2) Pātimokkha, (pāti)° (nt.) (with Childers plausibly as pa...
Mugdha
Mugdha (मुग्ध) or Mugdhanāyikā refers to a “tender, youthful, and young heroine”, of the Svakīy...
Dakkhinapatha
Dakkhiṇāpatha (or Dakṣiṇāpatha in Sanskrit) refers to the Deccan or “southern India”, as record...

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