Vilambitagati, aka: Vilambita-gati; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vilambitagati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Vilambitagati (विलम्बितगति) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the second, the sixth, the eighth, the twelfth, the fourteenth, the fifteenth and the seventeenth syllables of a foot (pāda) are heavy (guru), while the rest of the syllables are light (laghu). It is also known by the name Pṛthvī.

⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦
⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦

Vilambitagati falls in the Atyaṣṭi class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing seventeen syllables each.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Nāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Vilambitagati (विलम्बितगति) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) defined by Bharata, to which Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) assigned the alternative name of Pṛthvī in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ. This is a peculiar feature of Sanskrit prosody.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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