Vidvas: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Vidvas means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Vidvas (विद्वस्) refers to “one who is learned”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 2), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “[...] If there were no Jyotiṣakas, the muhūrtas, the tithis, the nakṣatras, the ṛtus and the āyanas would go wrong. It therefore behoves a prince who loves success, fame, wealth, happiness and renown, to secure the services of a learned [i.e., vidvas] Jyotiṣaka”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vidvas (विद्वस्) refers to “scholars”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, as Śiva said to Himācala (i.e., Himālaya): “This auspicious slender-bodied maiden of comely hips and moon-like face should not be brought near me. I forbid you again and again. A woman is a phase of illusion. As the scholars [i.e., vidvas] who have mastered the Vedas say particularly, a young damsel is a hindrance to ascetics. O mountain, I am an ascetic, a yogin, never affected by illusion. Of what avail is a woman thrust on me? [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Vidvas (विद्वस्) refers to “those who are learned”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala, Ṣaṭka 1 verse 13.3–18::—Accordingly, “[...] [And], O Goddess, [the Śivadharmadīkṣā] has two forms: in Śaiva scriptures the division of initiation is called that without the seed and that with the seed. [...] The sabījā is the opposite to this and is performed, O beautiful one, for those who are learned (vidvas), endure extremes and are able bodied. By those the rituals towards the Guru, the God and the fire have to be performed with extreme devotion, since the desired fruit will not come about for them who don’t do [these rites]. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Vidvas (विद्वस्) refers to a “wise man”, according to verse 4.243 of the Mohacūrottara (Mohacūḍottara), a Śaiva text from the 10th century.—Accordingly, “The reward that a wise man (vidvas) gains from establishing a mobile image [i.e. an ascetic] in a maṭha is the same as the reward that he gains from establishing a fixed image in a temple”.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (tantric Buddhism)

Vidvas (विद्वस्) [=Vidus?] refers to “wise persons”, according to Vāgīśvarakīrti’s Tattvaratnāvaloka verse 17.—Accordingly, “Cleansed by the oozing of the seed (i.e. semen) from the thunderbolt (i.e.the officiant’s penis) growing as a sprout born from a purified lotus (i.e. the consecrated vulva of the consort), the crop that is the fourth [state of consciousness] comes to full bloom; [although] the Fourth [Initiation] is manifest, it is hidden even from the wise (vidvasviduṣo'pi gūḍham)”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Vidvas (विद्वस्) refers to “one who knows” (as opposed to Avidvas—‘one who is ignorant’), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Alone [the living soul] who is very wise becomes a god [like] a bee on a lotus [like] the face of a woman. Alone, being cut by swords, he appropriates a hellish embryo. Alone the one who is ignorant (avidvas; var.—vidvas—‘the one who knows does’), driven by the fire of anger, etc., does action. Alone [the living soul] enjoys the empire of knowledge in the avoidance of all mental blindness. [Thus ends the reflection on] solitariness”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vidvas (विद्वस्).—a. [vid-kvasu] (Nom. sing. m. vidvān; f. viduṣī; n. vidvat)

1) Knowing (with acc.); आनन्दं ब्रह्मणो विद्वान् न विभेति कदाचन (ānandaṃ brahmaṇo vidvān na vibheti kadācana); तव विद्वानपि तापकारणम् (tava vidvānapi tāpakāraṇam) R.8.76; Kirātārjunīya 11.3.

2) Wise, learned. -m. A learned or wise man, scholar; किं वस्तु विद्वन् गुरवे प्रदेयम् (kiṃ vastu vidvan gurave pradeyam) R.5.18.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vidvas (विद्वस्).—mfn. (-dvān-duṣī-dvat) 1. Intelligent, wise. 2. Learned. m. (-dvān) A sage, a seer, one who knows the true nature of the soul and of God. E. vid to know, kvasu aff. in lieu of śatṛ, the usual affix of the present participle.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vidvas (विद्वस्):—[from vid] mf(uṣī)n. one who knows, knowing, understanding, learned, intelligent, wise, mindful of, familiar with, skilled in ([accusative] [locative case], or [compound]), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc. (cf. vidvat-tara, vidvat-tama, viduṣṭara, viduzI-tara)

2) [v.s. ...] m. a wise man, sage, seer, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a Brāhman, [Harivaṃśa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vidvas (विद्वस्):—[(dvān-duṣī-dvat) a.] Intelligent, learned. m. A sage.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vidvas (विद्वस्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Viu, Viuma, Viusa, Viussa, Vijja, Viduma, Viddāya.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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