Vidagdhaka: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Vidagdhaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[«previous next»] — Vidagdhaka in Chandas glossary
Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Vidagdhaka (विदग्धक) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Vidagdhaka corresponds to Vāg (according to Bharata). Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Vidagdhaka in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Vidagdhaka (विदग्धक) or Vidagdhakasaṃjñā refers to a “burned corpse” and represents the ninth and last of the “nine horrible notions” (aśubhasaṃjñā), according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 35. These nine notions of the horrible eliminate the seven types of lust (saptavidha-rāga) in people. By means of the meditation on the nine notions [viz., Vidagdhaka], the minds of lust (rāga) are eliminated, but hatred (dveṣa) and delusion (moha) are also decreased. These nine notions eventually lead to the enjoyment of the eternal bliss of Nirvāṇa.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: BDK Tripiṭaka: The Susiddhikara-sūtra

Vidagdhaka (विदग्धक) refers to one of the various types of cakes mentioned in Chapter 12 (“offering food”) of the Susiddhikara-sūtra. Accordingly, “Offer [viz., vidagdhaka cakes], [...]. Cakes such as the above are either made with granular sugar or made by mixing in ghee or sesamum oil. As before, take them in accordance with the family in question and use them as offerings; if you offer them up as prescribed, you will quickly gain success. [...]”.

When you wish to offer food [viz., vidagdhaka cakes], first cleanse the ground, sprinkle scented water all around, spread out on the ground leaves that have been washed clean, such as lotus leaves, palāśa (dhak) leaves, and leaves from lactescent trees, or new cotton cloth, and then set down the oblatory dishes. [...] First smear and sprinkle the ground and then spread the leaves; wash your hands clean, rinse out your mouth several times, swallow some water, and then you should set down the food [viz., vidagdhaka]. [...]

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vidagdhaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vidagdhaka (विदग्धक).—nt. (not in this sense in Pali; Vism i.110.29 vicchiddakaṃ seems to take its place vaguely, but of course is quite different in meaning), a corpse burnt by fire; -saṃjñā, contemplation of the notion of such a corpse, [Page487-b+ 71] one of the aśubha-bhāvanā (q.v.) or -saṃjñā: Mahāvyutpatti 1163; Śatasāhasrikā-prajñāpāramitā 59.17; 1258.8 (here misprinted vidagnaka).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vidagdhaka (विदग्धक):—[=vi-dagdhaka] [from vi-dah] m. a burning corpse, [Buddhist literature]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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