Veshtaka, Vēṣṭaka, Veṣṭaka: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Veshtaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Vēṣṭaka and Veṣṭaka can be transliterated into English as Vestaka or Veshtaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—lit. enclosure or envelope; the term is used in the sense of परिग्रहं (parigrahaṃ) with reference to the repetition of one and the same word more than once in the Krama and other artificial recitals; cf. परिग्रहे त्वनाषीन्तात् तेन वैकाक्षरीकृतात् । परॆषां न्यास-माचारं, व्यालिस्तौ चेत् स्वरौ परौ ॥ (parigrahe tvanāṣīntāt tena vaikākṣarīkṛtāt | paraॆṣāṃ nyāsa-mācāraṃ, vyālistau cet svarau parau ||) on which Uvvata remarks परिग्रहे वेष्टके (parigrahe veṣṭake).

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (V) next»] — Veshtaka in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक) in “naveṣṭakaveṣṭanā” is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 19.16.—Translation follows the construction nava + iṣṭaka. But Cāṇḍūpaṇḍita construes the expression also as “na veṣṭakaveṣṭanā” and explains veṣṭaka as a kind of resin used for catching birds. He gives cepa as an equivalent. See notes. Cāṇḍū’s explanation is ofund also in Īśānadeva and Jinarāja, but the latter two give another very curious meaning of veṣṭaka—“latrine”!

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vēṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—a S That environs, encompasses, surrounds, wraps, covers.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vēṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—a That environs, wraps.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—[veṣṭ-ṇvul]

1) An enclosure, a fence.

2) A pumpkin-gourd.

3) (In gram.) Putting a word before and after इति (iti).

-kam 1 A turban.

2) A wrapper, mantle.

3) Gum, exudation.

4) Turpentine.

Derivable forms: veṣṭakaḥ (वेष्टकः).

--- OR ---

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—A particular position in copulation.

Derivable forms: veṣṭakaḥ (वेष्टकः).

See also (synonyms): veṣṭanaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—nt. (Sanskrit Lex. turban), according to Tibetan seṅ ras, white (or, thin) (cotton) cloth: Mahāvyutpatti 5875. But Chin. linen cloth (no color word).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Surrounding, a surrounder, that which encompasses or encloses. n.

(-kaṃ) 1. A turban. 2. Exudation, resin gum, &c. 3. Turpentine. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A wall, a fence. 2. A pumpkingourd. E. veṣṭa, with kan added; or veṣṭ to surround, aff. vun or ṇvul .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक).—[veṣṭ + aka], I. adj. Surrounding, a surrounder. Ii. m. 1. A wall, a fence. 2. A pumpkin gourd. Iii. n. 1. A turban. 2. Resin. 3. Turpentine.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Veṣṭaka (वेष्टक):—[from veṣṭ] m. See aṅguli-v

2) [v.s. ...] a wall, fence, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] (in gram.) putting a word before and after iti, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā-prātiśākhya]

4) [v.s. ...] Beninkasa Cerifera, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] mn. turpentine, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] n. a head-band, turban, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] resin, gum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] mfn. who or what encompasses or surrounds, [Horace H. Wilson]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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