Vegavati, Vegavatī, Vega-vati: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vegavati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Vegavatī (वेगवती) is the name of a meter belonging to the Śīrṣaka class described in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 32:—“the metre which has in its feet of twenty-six syllables the fifth, the twelfth, the thirteenth and the last long, is vegavatī”.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Vegavatī (वेगवती) refers to one of the twelve ardhasama-varṇavṛtta (semi-regular syllabo-quantitative verse) mentioned in the 333rd chapter of the Agnipurāṇa. The Agnipurāṇa deals with various subjects viz. literature, poetics, grammar, architecture in its 383 chapters and deals with the entire science of prosody (e.g., the vega-vatī metre) in 8 chapters (328-335) in 101 verses in total.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Vegavati in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Vegavatī (वेगवती) is the name of a Vidyādharī who transformed herself into Madanamañcukā, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 105. Accordingly, “... in the meanwhile an unmarried Vidyādharī, of the name of Vegavatī, having beheld Madanamañcukā in her splendid and glorious beauty, deliberately took her shape, and came and stood alone in the garden under an aśoka tree. Marubhūti saw her, as he was roaming about in search of the queen, and she seemed at once to extract the dart from his pierced heart.”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Vegavatī, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vegavati in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vegavatī (वेगवती) is the name of a sacred river as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.12, “somehow men must strive to find a residence in a holy centre. On the shores of the ocean in the confluence of hundreds of rivers there are many such holy centres (puṇyakṣetra or tīrtha) and temples. [...] The rivers Tāmraparnī and Vegavatī accord Brahmaloka. There are holy centres on their banks bestowing heaven on the worshipper. In between these rivers there are meritorious holy centres. Intelligent men residing there will reap the respective fruits thereof”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Vegavatī (वेगवती) is the wife of Siṃharatha (son of Mānasavegā and Vidhyādhara-king Vidyudratha from Alakā), according to chapter 5.4 [śāntinātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as Megharatha related:—“In this Jambūdvīpa in Bharata in the northern row on Vaitāḍhya there is a fine city Alakā. A Vidhyādhara-king, Vidyudratha, and his agreeable wife, Mānasavegā, lived there. He had a son by her, the tree of whose arm was blooming with power, named Siṃharatha, because of a dream of a chariot with lions for steeds. He married a maiden, Vegavatī, belonging to an eminent family, suitable to himself, like the Moon marrying Rohiṇī. King Vidyudratha made him yuvarāj. For that is a suitable thing for kings to do when the son has reached military age. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana (history)

Vegavatī (वेगवती) is the name of a river and is the modern Baiga or Bijari in the district of Madura. See ‘Geographical Dictionary of Ancient and Medieval India’ (N. L. De) P. 38.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vegavatī (वेगवती):—[=vega-vatī] [from vega-vat > vega] f. Name of a river, [Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] a [particular] drug, [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Piṅgala Scholiast, i.e. halāyudha]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of a Vidyādharī, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

5) [v.s. ...] ([plural]) Name of a class of Apsarasas or celestial nymphs, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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