Vatsaraja, Vatsarāja, Vatsa-raja: 7 definitions

Introduction

Vatsaraja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (V) next»] — Vatsaraja in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: A critical appreciation of soddhalas udayasundarikatha

Vatsarāja (वत्सराज).—Soḍḍhala mentions Vatsarāja as the lord poet of Caulukya dynasty of Lāṭa-deśa, the crest jewel of the family of Lāṭa kings and a friend of Koṅkaṇa kings. A copper plate grant of king Trilocanapāla, Caulukya of Lāṭa-deśa, the son of Vatsarāja, dated Śaka 972, A.D. 1050.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (V) next»] — Vatsaraja in Purana glossary
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Vatsarāja (वत्सराज) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.177.20) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vatsa-rāja) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)

Vatsarāja is the name of a king who belonged to the Pratihāra dynasty. An inscription from Chanderi in the Guna District (in the former Gwalior State) of Madhya Bhārat (11th century A.D.)  mentions Nīlakaṇṭha who was followed in succession by Harirāja, Bhīmadeva, Raṇapāla, Vatsarāja, Svarṇapāla, Kīrttipāla, Abhayapāla, Govindarāja, Rājarāja, Vīrarāja and Jaitravarman.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (V) next»] — Vatsaraja in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vatsarāja (वत्सराज).—a king of the Vatsas; लोके हारि च वत्सराजचरितं नाट्ये च दक्षा वयम् (loke hāri ca vatsarājacaritaṃ nāṭye ca dakṣā vayam) Ratn.1.

Derivable forms: vatsarājaḥ (वत्सराजः).

Vatsarāja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vatsa and rāja (राज). See also (synonyms): vatseśa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—father of Acala (Śāṅkhāyanāhnika). Peters. 2, 170.

2) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—father of Śrī Kāhna, grandfather of Bhaṭṭa Mādhava (Siddhāntaratnāvalī Sārasvataṭīkā). Kh. 69.

3) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—father of Haridāsa (Lekhakamuktāmaṇi). Oxf. 341^b.

4) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—poet. Śp. p. 81.

5) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—Nirṇayadīpikā q. v.

6) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—Bhojaprabandha. Hāsyacūḍāmaṇi prahasana.

7) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—son of Rāghava, grandson of Gaṇeśa Agnihotrin, pupil of Rāmāśrama, son of Bhaṭṭoji, composed in 1641: Vārāṇasīdarpaṇa and—[commentary].

8) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—Maṇikarṇikālaharī kāvya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vatsarāja (वत्सराज):—[=vatsa-rāja] [from vatsa] m. a king of the Vatsas, [Mahābhārata] [Ratnāvalī; Kathāsaritsāgara]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of various authors and other men (also -deva), [Catalogue(s)]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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