Vati, Vāti, Vāṭī, Vatī, Vaṭi: 13 definitions

Introduction

Vati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Vāṭī (वाटी) is a Sanskrit word referring to a kind of aquatic bird (“grede”). The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Ayurvedic literature. The animal Vāṭī is part of the sub-group named Ambucārin, refering to animals “which move on waters”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Vaṭi (वटि, “pill”) is another name for Gulikā, a Sanskrit technical term appearing in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva..—When the powdered drugs are mixed with the syrup of jaggary, sugar or guggulu or ground with water, milk or svarasa and made balls and dried it is known as Guḷikā [Gulikā]. Vaṭaka, vaṭi, modaka, vaṭikā, piṇḍī and varti are its synonyms.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

1) Vati (वति).—tad. affix वत् (vat) in the sense of similar activity or thing; e. g. राजवद्वर्तते, मथुरावत् स्त्रुघ्ने प्राकारः (rājavadvartate, mathurāvat strughne prākāraḥ); cf. तेन तुल्यं क्रिया चेद्वतिः । तत्र तस्येव (tena tulyaṃ kriyā cedvatiḥ | tatra tasyeva) P.V.1.115, 116;

2) Vati.—tad. affix वत् (vat) in the sense of deserving;e.g, राजवत् पालनम् (rājavat pālanam) ; cf. तदर्हम् (tadarham) P.V.1.117;

3) Vati.—tad. affix वत् (vat) applied to prefixes in Vedic Literature without any sense of its own ; e.g यदुद्वतो निवतो याति बप्सत् (yadudvato nivato yāti bapsat); cf. उपसर्गा-च्छन्दसि धात्वर्थे (upasargā-cchandasi dhātvarthe) P.V. 1. 118.

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Vatī (वती).—The possessive affix वत् (vat) (मतुप् (matup)) with fem. ई (ī) added; cf. विश्वदेव्यसोमौ वत्याम् (viśvadevyasomau vatyām) (दीर्धमापद्येते (dīrdhamāpadyete)) V.Pr.III.117.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Vaṭī (वटी) refers to a “small cowrie” (an insignificant amount), and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 7.79 (“jātaṃ vaṭīmapyadhunā na labdhum”: “not even worth a chowrie”). [...] In verse 2.88 and 3.88 varāṭikā is used in the sense of a cowrie. There is a “varāṭikāsapramīvrata” in which any food bought at a price of three cowries should be taken. See citation from Bhaviṣyatpurāṇa in Kṛtyakalpataru (Vratakāṇḍa), p. 184. The form varāṭa occurs in Naiṣadhacarita 22.13.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Va-ti.—(IE 8-1), contraction of vadya-pakṣa-tithi, though va may be a mistake for ba (bahula). Note: va-ti is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Vāṭi or Vāṭī.—(IE 8-6; EI 28, 30), also called vāṭikā (q. v.); land measure equal to twenty māṇas in Orissa. Note: vāṭi is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Vā-ṭī.—abbreviation of vāstu-ṭīkara, ‘a mound containing land suitable for building houses.’ See Ep. Ind., Vol. XXX, p. 56. Note: vā-ṭī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vati : (f.) a fence. || vāti (vā + a) blows; emits some smell.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Vati, 2 (f.) (fr. vṛ, cp. Sk. vṛti) a choice, boon DhA. I, 190 (pubbe Sāmā nāma vatiyā pana kāritattā Sāmāvatī nāma jātā). (Page 597)

2) Vati, 1 (f.) (later Sk. vṛti, fr. vṛ) a fence J. I, 153; III, 272; V, 472; Vism. 186 (vatī, v. l. vati); SnA 98 (v. l. for gutti), 148 (v. l. for °vatikā). (Page 597)

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Vāti, see vāyati (in meaning “weave, ” as well as “blow”). (Page 608)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vaṭī (वटी).—See under ओ.

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vāṭī (वाटी).—f A saucer-form vessel of metal. 2 A half of a cocoanut-shell; a thing in general hollow like a cup; the patella or pan of the knee; the cup or bell of a flower; a half-cockle or other bivalvular shell; the cup or collet of the gem (in a ring or other ornament).

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vaṭī (वटी).—f A bed or plat. A pill. A cake or pat.

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vāṭī (वाटी).—f A garden, orchard.

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vāṭī (वाटी).—f A saucer-form vessel of metal. A half of a cocoanut-shell.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaṭi (वटि).—

1) A sort of ant.

2) A kind of insect.

3) See वठिका (vaṭhikā).

Derivable forms: vaṭiḥ (वटिः).

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Vaṭī (वटी).—

1) A rope or string.

2) A pill, bolus.

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Vati (वति).—(vā-'tiḥ nit Uṇ.5.6) The wind. -f. (vanantyalopaḥ jhalādau viṅti P.V1.4.37) Asking, begging.

Derivable forms: vatiḥ (वतिः).

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Vāṭī (वाटी).—

1) The site of a house.

2) A house, dwelling.

3) A court, an enclosure.

4) A garden, park, orchard; वाटीभुवि क्षितिभुजाम् (vāṭībhuvi kṣitibhujām) Āṣval.5; Bhāg.1.6.11.

5) A road.

6) The groin.

7) A kind of grain.

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Vāti (वाति).—[vā-ktic]

1) The sun.

2) Wind, air.

3) The moon.

Derivable forms: vātiḥ (वातिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaṭi (वटि).—m.

(-ṭiḥ) A sort of tick or body louse. E. vaṭ to surround, aff. in .

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Vāti (वाति).—m.

(-tiḥ) 1. The sun. 2. The moon. 3. Air, wind. E. to go, Unadi aff. ktic .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaṭi (वटि).—m. A sort of insect.

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Vāti (वाति).—m. 1. (vb. ), Air, wind. 2. The sun. 3. The moon.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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