Vatada, aka: Vātāḍa, Vātāda, Vata-ada; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vatada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

vātāḍa (वाताड).—a (Commonly vātaḍa) Tough, lit. fig. Pr. śēḷī jātī jivānaśī khāṇāra mhaṇatō vātāḍaśī.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vātaḍa (वातड).—a Tough. Fig. Stubborn.

--- OR ---

vātāḍa (वाताड).—a Tough. Fig. Stubborn.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vātāda (वाताद).—the almond tree.

Derivable forms: vātādaḥ (वातादः).

Vātāda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vāta and ada (अद).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 889 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Vata
Vaṭa (वट).—(-vaṭa), usually banyan, is sometimes applied to the bodhi-tree (see s.v. bodhi 2): ...
Nishada
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Kravyada
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Kanada
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Dayada
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Amavata
Āmavāta (आमवात) refers to “rhumetoid arthritis” (a chronic inflammatory disorder). Medicinal fo...
Ada
Ada (अद).—a. (at the end of comp.) Eating, devouring; मांसाद (māṃsāda) carnivorous, feeding on ...
Vatahata
Vātāhata (वाताहत).—mfn. (-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Stirred or shaken by the wind. 2. Affected by rheumati...
Vatarakta
Vātarakta (वातरक्त) refers to “gout” (Arthritis: joint inflammation caused by uric acid crystal...
Annada
Annada (अन्नद).—mfn. (-daḥ-dā-daṃ) One who gives food. f. (-dā) A goddess, a form of Durga. E. ...
Vatagohali
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Vataroga
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Cakravata
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Vatadhana
Vāṭadhāna (वाटधान).—m. (-naḥ) The descendant of an outcast Brahman by a Brahman female.
Shvada
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