Vasaga, Vashaga, Vaśaga, Vasha-ga: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Vasaga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Vaśaga can be transliterated into English as Vasaga or Vashaga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vaśaga (वशग) refers to “servants” [?], according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.16 (“Brahmā consoles the gods”).—Accordingly, as the Gods said to Brahmā: “[...] O dear, lord of all, we are extremely harassed and agitated due to Tāraka. Agni, Yama, Varuṇa, Nirṛti, Vāyu and other guardians of the deities are under his control. None of them is ever independent. All serve him in the manner of human beings accompanied by their followers. Being harassed by him, the gods have become subservient of him. They are engaged in carrying out his wishes. All of us are his servants [i.e., vaśaga]. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Vaśaga (वशग) refers to “depending on (one’s own karma)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Having abandoned the tree, as the birds go in the early morning, in like manner the embodied souls continually go somewhere depending on their own karma (svakarma-vaśaga)”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vasaga : (adj.) being in someone's power.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaśaga (वशग).—(so vaśaṃgata) a. obedient to the will of another, submissive, subject; नमस्यामो देवान्ननु हतविधेस्तेऽपि वशगाः (namasyāmo devānnanu hatavidheste'pi vaśagāḥ) Bhartṛhari 2.94. (-m.) a servant.

Vaśaga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vaśa and ga (ग). See also (synonyms): vaśānuga, vaśavartin.

--- OR ---

Vaśaga (वशग).—a. subject, obedient; नमस्यामो देवान्ननु हतविधेस्तेऽपि वशगाः (namasyāmo devānnanu hatavidheste'pi vaśagāḥ) Bhartṛhari 2.94; Pañcatantra (Bombay) 1.139.

- an obedient wife.

Vaśaga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vaśa and ga (ग).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaśaga (वशग).—mfn.

(-gaḥ-gā-gaṃ) Obedient, subject. f.

(-gā) An obedient wife. E. vaśa subject, and ga who goes or is.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaśaga (वशग).—[vaśa + ga], 1. adj. Obedient, subject, Mahābhārata 3, 14687; [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 155; 285. 2. f. , An obedient wife.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaśaga (वशग).—[adjective] being in the power of, subject or obedient to, dependent on ([genetive] or —°); [abstract] tva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vaśaga (वशग):—[=vaśa-ga] [from vaśa > vaś] mf(ā)n. being in the power of. subject, obedient, dependent on ([genitive case] or [compound]), [Mahābhārata] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) subjugating, [Pañcarātra]

3) Vaśagā (वशगा):—[=vaśa-gā] [from vaśa-ga > vaśa > vaś] f. an obedient wife, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaśagā (वशगा):—[vaśa-gā] (gā) 1. f. An obedient wife.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vasaga in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Vāsaga (वासग) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Vāsaka.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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