Varshat, Varṣat: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Varshat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Varṣat can be transliterated into English as Varsat or Varshat, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Varṣat (वर्षत्) means “raining”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. [...] Īśāna is the upper face. Both supreme and inferior, its nature is creation. (White) like snow, jasmine and the moon, it is stainless like pure crystal. It nourishes the entire universe with its moon rays as it rains [i.e., varṣatvarṣantaṃ] in a great torrent a stream of nectar-like (bliss). Contemplating Īśāna (in this way) one attains (all eight) yogic powers. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Varṣat (वर्षत्) (Cf. Varṣantī) refers to “raining down”, according to the Kulakaulinīmata 5.88-99.—Accordingly, “The goddess (Tripurabhairavī) is red like vermillion and the Bandhūka flower. [...] One should meditate constantly on the Goddess who, in this form, is in the middle of a Kadamba forest in the midst of the eight (Mothers) Brahmī and the rest (each in their) own (place). A thousand petalled lotus is (above her) on the upper path. (It) rains down [i.e., varṣat] with a great current (of nectar) and is (red) like burning lac. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Varṣat (वर्षत्).—mfn. (-rṣan-rṣantī-rṣat) Raining, showering, sprinkling. E. vṛṣ to rain, śatṛ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Varṣat (वर्षत्):—[from varṣa] mfn. raining (varṣati [locative case] ‘while it rains’), [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] m. rain, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] m. or n. (?) a summer-house, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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