Vanchita, Vañchita, Vāñchita, Vamchita: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Vanchita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Vanchhita.

Ambiguity: Although Vanchita has separate glossary definitions below, it also represents an alternative spelling of the word Vancita. It further has the optional forms Vañchita and Vañchitā.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित) refers to “that which one desires”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] He should offer bali at a crossroads, (at the foot of) a solitary tree or a cremation ground or at the gathering of the Mothers. He does this once he has placed the sacrificial food (there) and eaten a little of it in front of the Krama. Within six months (he attains) success, and in eight (he becomes) pure. Satisfied, (the Yoginīs) give (him) whatever he desires [i.e., vāñchita]. Success is to be found in the sacred seats, primary and secondary, or in the meeting grounds and in the gathering of (initiates) of the Rule as well as in the eight houses (of the Mothers) for one who is fearless and not otherwise. [...]”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित) refers to the “objects of desire”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] May the goddess Vajreśvarī give me all objects of my desire (vāñchita). She is known to have her abode at the right corner [of the central triangle]. She is resplendent like a thunderbolt, beautiful like fresh coral, and has a bow, arrows, a snare, a hook, a shield, and a mātuluṅga fruit attached to her six arms. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित) refers to the “desired fruit”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala, Ṣaṭka 1 verse 13.3–18::—Accordingly, “[...] [And], O Goddess, [the Śivadharmadīkṣā] has two forms: in Śaiva scriptures the division of initiation is called that without the seed and that with the seed. [...] The sabījā is the opposite to this and is performed, O beautiful one, for those who are learned, endure extremes and are able bodied. By those the rituals towards the Guru, the God and the fire have to be performed with extreme devotion, since the desired fruit (vāñchita) will not come about for them who don’t do [these rites]. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित).—p p. Wished, desired.

-tam A wish, desire.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Wished, desired. n.

(-taṃ) Wish. E. vācchi to wish, kta aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित).—[adjective] wished for, desired; [neuter] wish. desire.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vāñchita (वाञ्छित):—[from vāñch] mfn. wished, desired, beloved, longed for, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] n. wish, desire, [ib.]

3) [v.s. ...] m. (in music) a kind of measure.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) p.] Desired.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vāñchita (वाञ्छित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Cāhiya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vanchita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vāṃchita (ವಾಂಛಿತ):—[adjective] wished; desired.

--- OR ---

Vāṃchita (ವಾಂಛಿತ):—

1) [noun] a strong wish; a desire.

2) [noun] that which is desired.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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