Valuka, Vālukā, Valūka: 11 definitions

Introduction

Valuka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Vāluka (वालुक) is another name for Elavālu, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Prunus cerasus Linn. (sour cherry) from the Rosaceae or “rose” family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.124-126 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Vāluka and Elavālu, there are a total of fourteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)

Vālukā or Valuka is the name of a river corresponding with Barua, as mentioned in inscriptions from Baṅglā (1281 A.D.). The battle referred to in the inscriptions probably lasted only for a day. A large number of soldiers on Vīravarman’s side must also have lost their lives ; but there is no record of that besides vague claims on behalf of the partisans of Gopāla in the records under study. The battle is stated to have been fought on the banks of the river variously called Valuvā, Volukā, Valuā, Valūbā, Vālukā and Valuka which is no other than the modern Barua.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vālukā : (f.) sand.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vālukā, (f.) (cp. Vedic & Epic Sk. vālukā) sand. In compn usually vāluka°.—S. IV, 376; Vv 391; 441; Ap. 23; Nd2 p. 72 (Gaṅgāya v.); J. II, 258; IV, 16; Pv. II, 121; Mhvs 23, 86; DhA. III, 243, 445; VvA. 31, 177; Sdhp. 244. See also vālika. (Page 610)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vālukā (वालुका).—f S Sand.

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vāḷūka (वाळूक).—n A wen, Sarcoma. 2 A sort of melon or cucumber. Pr. vāḷakāñcī cōrī bukyāñcā māra For slight offences slight punishment. Pr. vāḷakā- vara surī paḍalī tarīṃ vāḷakācā nāśa surīvara vāḷūka paḍalēṃ tarīṃ vāḷakācā nāśa Conflict betwixt unequals surely issues in the destruction or detriment of the inferior party. See a similar proverb under sāsū.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vālukā (वालुका).—f Sand.

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vāḷūka (वाळूक).—n A wen, Sarcoma. A sort of cucumber.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Valūka (वलूक).—[val-īkan Uṇ.4.42] A kind of bird.

-kam The root of lotus.

Derivable forms: valūkaḥ (वलूकः).

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Vālukā (वालुका).—[Uṇ.2.29]

1) Sand, gravel; भूमि-पाषाणसिकता-शर्करा-वालुका-भस्मशायिनः (bhūmi-pāṣāṇasikatā-śarkarā-vālukā-bhasmaśāyinaḥ) Mb.12.192.1; अकृतज्ञस्योप- कृतं वालुकास्विव मूत्रितम् (akṛtajñasyopa- kṛtaṃ vālukāsviva mūtritam).

2) Powder

3) Camphor in general.

-kā, -kī A kind of cucumber.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Valūka (वलूक).—n.

(-kaṃ) The root of the lotus. m.

(-kaḥ) A bird. E. val to surround, Unadi aff. ūka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Valūka (वलूक).—m. 1. A bird. 2. (n.), The root of a lotus.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Valūka (वलूक):—[from val] mfn. ([Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 40]) red or black, [Pañcaviṃśa-brāhmaṇa; ???] ([Scholiast or Commentator])

2) [v.s. ...] m. a bird, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] m. n. the root of a lotus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Vāluka (वालुक):—[from vālu] mfn. ([from] next)

5) [v.s. ...] containing or resembling sand, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] made of salt, [Rāmāyaṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] m. a kind of poison, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [from vālu] camphor, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Cucumis Utilissimus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Vālukā (वालुका):—[from vālu] f. sg. and [plural] (more commonly written bālukā; of doubtful derivation) sand, gravel, [Śvetāśvatara-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata etc.]

11) Vālūka (वालूक):—[from vālu] m. a kind of poison, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. vāluka)

12) Vālūkā (वालूका):—[from vālūka > vālu] f. = vālukā, sand, [Rāmāyaṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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