Vallura, Vallūra: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vallura means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Vallūra (वल्लूर) is a Sanskrit word referring to “dry fish”. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.13)

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vallura in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vallūra : (nt.) dried flesh.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vallura, (nt.) (cp. Class. Sk. vallūra) dried flesh S. II, 98; J. II, 245. (Page 603)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vallūra (वल्लूर).—[vall-uran]

1) A bower, an arbour.

2) A place overgrown with creepers, wood, thicket.

3) A branching foot-stalk.

4) An uncultivated field.

5) A desert, wild, wilderness.

6) Dried flesh.

Derivable forms: vallūram (वल्लूरम्).

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Vallūra (वल्लूर).—[vall-ūran] Uṇ.4.96]

1) Dried flesh; Kau. A.1.4; Ms.5.13.

2) The flesh of the (wild) hog.

-ram 1 A thicket.

2) A desert, wilderness.

3) An uncultivated field.

4) Ground impregnated with salt.

Derivable forms: vallūraḥ (वल्लूरः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vallura (वल्लुर).—n.

(-raṃ) 1. An arbour, a bower, a place over-grown with creeping plants. 2. An uncultivated field or place over-run with wild grass. 3. A sand, a desert, a place destitute of water. 4. A field. 5. A compound pedicle. 6. A solitude, a wild. 7. A thicket, a wood. 8. Dried flesh. E. vall to cover, uran aff.; also vallūra .

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Vallūra (वल्लूर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Dried flesh. 2. Hog's flesh, the flesh of the wild hog. n.

(-raṃ) 1. An uncultivated field, or one over run with grass. 2. A thicket. 3. A desert. E. vall to cover, ūran Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vallura (वल्लुर).—n. 1. A thicket, a wood. 2. An arbour, a bower. 3. A place overrun with wild grass, an uncultivated field. 4. A solitude, a wild. 5. A place destitute of water, a desert. 6. A field. 7. A compound pedicle.

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Vallūra (वल्लूर).—I. (m., f. , and) n. 1. Dried flesh, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 13. 2. Hog's flesh. Ii. n. (cf. the last). 1. A thicket. 2. A field overrun with grass. 3. A desert.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vallūra (वल्लूर).—[neuter] dried flesh.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vallura (वल्लुर):—[from vall] n. (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) an arbour, bower

2) [v.s. ...] a field

3) [v.s. ...] a thicket or wilderness

4) [v.s. ...] a place destitute of water

5) [v.s. ...] a cluster of blossoms

6) [v.s. ...] a compound pedicle.

7) Vallūra (वल्लूर):—[from vall] n. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] also m. and f(ā). ) dried flesh, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Suśruta]

8) [v.s. ...] hog’s flesh, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] m. (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) an uncultivated field

10) [v.s. ...] a desert

11) [v.s. ...] a thicket

12) [v.s. ...] = nakṣatra, white water.

13) [v.s. ...] Name of a clan of Brāhmans, [Inscriptions]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Vallura (वल्लुर):—n. = śādvala und kṣetra (kṣatra in [Medinīkoṣa] gedr.) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 598.] [Medinīkoṣa Rāmāyaṇa 212.] = kuñja, mañjarī und anambhas [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] = gahana und auṣadha [Medinīkoṣa] Nach [Śabdakalpadruma] sollen [VIŚVA], [DHARA.] und [Śabdaratnāvalī] vallara n. lesen. — Vgl. vallūra .

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Vallūra (वल्लूर):—[UJJVAL.] zu [Uṇādisūtra 4, 90.] m. f. n. [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 5, 22.] getrocknetes Fleisch, m. f. (ā) und n. [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 2, 14.] [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 370.] [Medinīkoṣa Rāmāyaṇa 212.] n. [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 624.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 598. fg.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 5, 13.] [Yājñavalkya’s Gesetzbuch 1, 175.] [Suśruta 1, 41, 16. 70, 6. 103, 14. 2, 233, 11. 457, 15.] Nach den Lexicographen ausserdem noch: Schweinefleisch, m. f. n. [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa] [Medinīkoṣa Nalopākhyāna] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] n. = vanakṣetra, vāhana und ūṣara [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] = nakṣatra, gahana und uścara (sic) [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa] — Vgl. vallura .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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