Valahaka, aka: Valāhaka; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Valahaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Valahaka in Purana glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—One of the eight rākṣasas facing the eight vasus in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Valahaka in Theravada glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

1. Valahaka. A family of horses from which the Assaratana of a Cakkavatti is supplied (KhpA. 172; M.iii.174). He is best among animals, because he takes his rider away from all danger (MA.ii.616). Noble chargers come from the Valahaka stock. DhA.iii.248.

2. Valahaka. The name of the horse of Mahasudassana. He is all white, with a crow black head and a dark mane. D.ii.174; cp. S.iii.145.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Valahaka in Pali glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

valāhaka : (m.) a rain cloud.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Valāhaka, (valāha+ka; of dial. origin; cp. Epic Sk. balāhaka) 1. a cloud, dark cloud, thundercloud S. I, 212= Th. 2, 55; A. II, 102; V, 22; Th. 1, 760; Pug. 42, 43; Vv 681; J. III, 245; 270 (ghana°); Vism. 285 (°paṭala); Miln. 274; DhsA. 317; VvA. 12 (=abbhā).—2. N. of mythical horses S. III, 145.

—kāyikā (devā) groups of cloud gods (viz. sīta°, uṇha°, abbha°, vāta°, vassa°) S. III, 254. (Page 603)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Valahaka in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [V] · next »

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—See बलाहक (balāhaka).

Derivable forms: valāhakaḥ (वलाहकः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 23 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Valahaka Sutta
Valāhaka, (valāha+ka; of dial. origin; cp. Epic Sk. balāhaka) 1. a cloud, dark cloud, thunder...
Valahaka Vagga
Valāhaka, (valāha+ka; of dial. origin; cp. Epic Sk. balāhaka) 1. a cloud, dark cloud, thunder...
Deva
1) Deva (देव) or Devāyu refers to “heavenly/celestial realms or states of existence” and r...
Balahaka
Balāhaka (बलाहक) or Balāhakaparvata is the name of a mountain situated on the island Nārikela, ...
Manda
Manda (मन्द).—1. The inequality in a planet's orbital motion that depends on its position with ...
Sugriva
Sugrīva (सुग्रीव) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, a...
Vivaha
Vivāha (विवाह) is the twenty-second of sixty digits (decimal place) in an special enumeration s...
Viddha
1) Viddha (विद्ध) refers to a one of the three varieties of yati: rules used in the playing of ...
Vassa
Vassa, (m. & nt.) (cp. Vedic varṣa (nt.) rain. For etym. see vassati1) 1. rain, shower J. IV, 2...
Ratana
Raṭana (रटन).—[raṭ-lyuṭ]1) The act of crying, screaming or shouting.2) A shout of applause, app...
Abbha Sutta
Abbha, (nt.) (Vedic abhra nt. & later Sk. abhra m. “dark cloud”; Idg. *m̊bhro, cp. Gr. a)fros ...
Abbha
Abbha, (nt.) (Vedic abhra nt. & later Sk. abhra m. “dark cloud”; Idg. *m̊bhro, cp. Gr. a)fros ...
Deva Sutta
Deva, (Ved. deva, Idg. *deịā to shine (see dibba & diva), orig. adj. *deiǔos belonging to the s...
Ratana Vagga
1) Ratana, 2 (most likely=Sk. aratni: see ratani) a linear measure (which Abhp p. 23 gives as e...
Ratana Paritta
1) Ratana, 2 (most likely=Sk. aratni: see ratani) a linear measure (which Abhp p. 23 gives as e...

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