Valahaka, Valāhaka: 10 definitions

Introduction

Valahaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (V) next»] — Valahaka in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—One of the eight rākṣasas facing the eight vasus in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

1. Valahaka. A family of horses from which the Assaratana of a Cakkavatti is supplied (KhpA. 172; M.iii.174). He is best among animals, because he takes his rider away from all danger (MA.ii.616). Noble chargers come from the Valahaka stock. DhA.iii.248.

2. Valahaka. The name of the horse of Mahasudassana. He is all white, with a crow black head and a dark mane. D.ii.174; cp. S.iii.145.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (V) next»] — Valahaka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

valāhaka : (m.) a rain cloud.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Valāhaka, (valāha+ka; of dial. origin; cp. Epic Sk. balāhaka) 1. a cloud, dark cloud, thundercloud S. I, 212= Th. 2, 55; A. II, 102; V, 22; Th. 1, 760; Pug. 42, 43; Vv 681; J. III, 245; 270 (ghana°); Vism. 285 (°paṭala); Miln. 274; DhsA. 317; VvA. 12 (=abbhā).—2. N. of mythical horses S. III, 145.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—See बलाहक (balāhaka).

Derivable forms: valāhakaḥ (वलाहकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vālāhaka (वालाहक).—= prec., the horse Valāha: Kāraṇḍavvūha 58.4; 59.9.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A cloud. 2. A mountain. 3. A Daitya, a demon. 4. One of the Nagas. 5. One of the horses of Krishna'S car. E. valākā a crane, to go, aff. kkun, deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Valāhaka (वलाहक).—v. balāhaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Valāhaka (वलाहक):—a m. or balāhaka ([Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska i,10]) a rain or thunder -cloud, any cloud, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc. (ifc. f(ā). )

2) one of the 7 clouds appearing at the destruction of the world, [Catalogue(s)]

3) a mountain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Cyperus Rotundus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) a kind of crane (= balāka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) a kind of snake, [Suśruta]

7) a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

8) Name of a serpent-demon, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Purāṇa]

9) of a commander, [Kādambarī]

10) of one of the 4 horses of Viṣṇu, [ib.]

11) of a brother of Jayad-ratha, [Mahābhārata]

12) of a Daitya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.];—of a mountain, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

13) b See balāhaka.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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