Vajraka: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vajraka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Vajraka (वज्रक) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified under the group named Triviṣṭapa, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 49. The Triviṣṭapa group contains ten out of a sixty-four total prāsādas (temples) classified under five prime vimānas (aerial car/palace), which were created by Brahmā for as many gods (including himself). This group represents temples (e.g. Vajraka) that are to be octangular in shape. The prāsādas, or ‘temples’, represent the dwelling place of God and are to be built in towns. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Vajraka is mentioned in another others list from the Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 56, first in the group named Lalita (containing 25 unique temple varieties) and secondly in the group named Sāndhāra (also containing 25 unique temple varieties).

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Vajraka (वज्रक).—One of the twelve rākṣasas facing the twelve ādityas in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vajraka (वज्रक).—

1) A kind of oil.

2) A particular phenomenon of the sky.

3) A diamond.

Derivable forms: vajrakam (वज्रकम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vajraka (वज्रक).—(1) adj. (from vajra; in Sanskrit only with taila, a medicinal oil), diamantine, hard, fig.: adhyāśayair vajrakaiḥ Lalitavistara 216.4 (verse); (2) name of a guhyaka (compare Pali Vajira, name of a yakkha): (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 532.16 (verse); (3) name of a mountain: Divyāvadāna 450.10, 13; 455.29; 456.1; (4) m., name of a muhūrta: Divyāvadāna 643.13; in 644.15 written varjanakaḥ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vajraka (वज्रक).—n.

(-kaṃ) A sort of salt, an impure carbonate of soda. E. kan added to the last.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vajraka (वज्रक):—[from vaj] mfn. (with taila) a kind of oil (prepared with various substances and used for curing skin diseases), [Suśruta]

2) [v.s. ...] m. Name of, a mountain, [Divyāvadāna]

3) [from vaj] n. a diamond, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] = vajra-kṣāra, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a [particular] phenomenon in the sky, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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