Vairagin, Vairāgī, Vairāgin, Vairagi: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Vairagin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Vairāgī (वैरागी).—A person in the renounced order of life.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vairagin in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vairāgin (वैरागिन्) refers to “one who is detached”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.25 (“The seven celestial sages test Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as the seven Sages said (with false words) to Pārvatī: “[...] O daughter of mountain, the good conduct of Nārada is thus well-known. Now hear about another activity of his in making men detached [i.e., vairāgin]. There was a Vidyādhara named Citraketu. The sage instructed him and made him detached from his house. He bestowed his instructions on Prahlāda and made him suffer much at the hands of Hiraṇyakaśipu. He is definitely a person who splits others’ intellect. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: archive.org: Sri Vijnana Bhairava Tantra

Vairagi refers to “non-attachment”.—The Vairagis are another sect of tantric practitioners, who experience intense detachment from the material phenomena and an attraction or pull towards the spiritual. The word Vairagya means ‘non-attachment’ and the Vairagis are known to transcend matter, which is a very rare and elevated state of awareness. Very few people in this world have true and constant Vairagya.

Source: Himalayan Academy: Dancing with Siva

Vairāgī (वैरागी) refers to “dispassionate one”.—An ascetic who lives by the principle of vairāgya. Also names a particular class of mendicants, generally Vaiṣṇavas, of North India who have freed themselves from worldly desires. See: monk, sannyāsa, tyāga.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Vairāgi.—(SITI), an ascetic serving in a temple. Note: vairāgi is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Vairāgī (वैरागी).—m (S) An ascetic or a devotee; one that has subdued his worldly desires and passions. The word is also applied to a class of religious mendicants.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Vairāgī (वैरागी).—m An ascetic or a devotee.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vairāgin (वैरागिन्).—m. An ascetic who has subdued all his passions and desires.

See also (synonyms): vairāgika.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vairāgin (वैरागिन्).—m. (-gī) An ascetic, a devotee, one who has subdued his worldly desires: at present the term in common use is applied to a particular class of religious mendicants. E. vairāga absence of passion, aff. ini .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vairāgin (वैरागिन्):—[from vairāga] mfn. idem, [Brahma-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a [particular] class of religious devotees or mendicants (generally Vaiṣṇavas) who have freed themselves from all worldly desires, [Religious Thought and Life in India 87.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vairāgī (वैरागी):—[from vairāga] f. (in music) a [particular] Rāgiṇī, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vairāgin (वैरागिन्):—(gī) 5. m. Idem; a religious mendicant.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vairagin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vairagin in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vairāgī (वैरागी):—(a and nm) detached; a recluse, one who is not attached to worldly affairs.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vairāgi (ವೈರಾಗಿ):—[noun] a man not influenced by personal interest, selfish motives, sensual enjoyments, worldly possessions, etc.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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