Vaijayanti, Vaijayantī: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vaijayanti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

The Vaijayanti (वैजयन्ति) is a necklace composed of a successive series of groups of gems, each group wherein has five gems in a particular order; it is described in the Viṣṇupurāṇa thus:—“Viṣṇu’s necklace called Vaijayanti is five-formed as it consists of the five elements, and it is therefore called the elemental necklace.”

Here five-formed points to five different kinds of gems, namely

  1. the pearl,
  2. ruby,
  3. emerald,
  4. blue-stone,
  5. and diamond”

The Viṣṇurahasya also says,

  1. “From the earth comes the blue gem,
  2. from water the pearl,
  3. from fire the kaustubha,
  4. from air the cat’s eye
  5. and from ether the Puṣparāga.”
Source: Google Books: Iconography of Balarāma

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) is another name for vanamālā as worn by Balarāma. According to the Viṣṇu-purāṇa, it is made of five different gems—emerald, pearl, bluestone, ruby and diamond.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती).—A garland containing flowers of five colors and reaching down to the knees. It is worn by Lord Kṛṣṇa.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vaijayanti in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती).—Two bells of Airāvata. Indra presented these two bells to Subrahmaṇya, who, in his turn, gave one of them to Viśākha. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 231, Stanza 13).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vaijayanti (वैजयन्ति).—The garland worn by Arjuna (Haihaya) and by Ananta;1 presented by sages to Balarāma after he killed Balavala.2 The garland of Harī.3

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 15. 20; V. 25. 7.
  • 2) Ib. X. 79. 8.
  • 3) Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 22. 72.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Vaijayanti in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Premna corymbosa Rottl.” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning vaijayantī] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Vaijayanti in Jainism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) is the mother of Ānanda: the sixth Baladeva according to Śvetāmbara sources. Jain legends describe nine such Baladevas (“gentle heroes”) usually appearing together with their “violent” twin-brothers known as the Vāsudevas. The legends of these twin-heroes usually involve their antagonistic counterpart known as the Prativāsudevas (anti-heroes).

The stories of Vaijayantī and Ānanda are narrated in texts such as the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacarita (“the lives of the sixty-three illustrious persons”), a twelfth-century Śvetāmbara work by Hemacandra.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

1) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) refers to one of the eight Dikkumārīs living on the eastern Rucaka mountains (in the Rucakadvīpa continent), according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, “[...] Eight Dikkumārīs [viz., Vaijayantī], living on the eastern Rucaka Mountains, came in chariots rivaling the mind (in speed) as it were. After bowing to the Master and to Marudevā and announcing themselves as before, singing auspicious songs, they stood in front, holding mirrors. [...].”.

2) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) is the name of a Vidyādhara-city, situated on mount Vaitāḍhya (in the southern row), according to chapter 1.3. Accordingly, “[...] Taking their families and all their retinue and ascending the best of cars, they went to Vaitāḍhya. [...] Ten yojanas above the earth, King Nami made fifty cities on the mountain in a southern row [viz., Vaijayantī]. Nami himself lived in Śrīrathanūpuracakravāla, the capital city among these cities. [...] The two rows of Vidyādhara-cities looked very magnificent, as if the Vyantara rows above were reflected below. After making many villages [viz., Vaijayantī] and suburbs, they established communities according to the suitability of place. The communities there were called by the same name as the community from which the men had been brought and put there. [...]”.

3) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) or Yaśomatī is the wife of Sumitravijaya: the younger brother of king Jitaśatru, according to chapter 2.2.—Accordingly: “Sumitrā’s wife, Vaijayantī, also called Yaśomatī, saw these same dreams that night. Then Vijayā and Vaijayantī passed the rest of the night awake, rejoicing like blooming night-lotuses. At dawn Lady Vijayā related the dreams to Jitaśatru and Vaijayantī to Sumitravijaya. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vaijayanti in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vaijayantī (वैजयंती).—f S Black basil, Ocymum nigrum. 2 A flower-tree, Sesbania Ӕgyptiaca.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vaijayantī (वैजयंती).—f Black basil.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vaijayanti in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती).—

1) A banner, flag; स्तनपरिणाहविलासवैजयन्ती (stanapariṇāhavilāsavaijayantī) Māl.3.15; Śi.18.4; न ह्यनारुह्य नागेन्द्रं वैजयन्ती निपात्यते (na hyanāruhya nāgendraṃ vaijayantī nipātyate) Śiva B.4.19.

2) An ensign.

3) A garland, necklace.

4) The necklace of Viṣṇu.

5) Name of a lexicon.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vaijayanti (वैजयन्ति).—(= Sanskrit °tī), flag, banner: -paṭākā-°ti- (in a long [compound]) Lalitavistara 295.15 (prose; so all mss.; Calcutta (see LV.) °tī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—lexicon, by Yādava Bhaṭṭa. Kāṭm. 10. Burnell. 50^a. Oppert. 1037. 2706. 5659. 6222. 8258. Ii, 6146. Bu7hler 544. Quoted by Hemacandra Oxf. 185^b, in Mādhavīyadhātuvṛtti, by Mallinātha, and others.

2) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती):—vedānta, by Tryambaka Śāstrin. Rice. 176.

3) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती):—Bhaṭṭikāvyaṭīkā by Kandarpa Śarman.

4) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती):—Viṣṇusmṛtiṭīkā by Nanda Paṇḍita. Properly called Keśavavaijayantī.

5) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती):—lexicon, by Yādava Bhaṭṭa. Gov. Or. Libr. Madras 90. Often quoted by Devaṇṇa in Smṛticandrikā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vaijayantī (वैजयन्ती):—[from vaijayanta] f. a flag, banner, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] an ensign, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of garland prognosticating victory, [Mahābhārata; Purāṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] the necklace of Viṣṇu, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of the 8th night of the civil month, [Sūryaprajñapti]

6) [v.s. ...] Premna Spinosa, [Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] Sesbania Aegyptiaca, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a lexicon by Yādavaprakāśa

9) [v.s. ...] of a [commentator or commentary] to Viṣṇu’s Dharmaśāstra ([Indian Wisdom, by Sir M. Monier-Williams 304, 305])

10) [v.s. ...] Name of various other works.

11) [v.s. ...] of a town or a river, [Atharva-veda.Pariś.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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