Vahika, Vāhīka, Vāhika: 11 definitions

Introduction

Vahika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Vāhīka (वाहीक) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—It is same as Vālhīka.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Vāhika (वाहिक).—A Brahmin who was well-versed in the Vedas. This Brahmin earned his bread by selling salt. In his life, he had committed sins. At last he was killed by a lion. The flesh of his dead body fell in the Gaṅgā in consequence of which he got remission of his sins. (Skanda Purāṇa 2: 4: 1-28).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Vāhīka (वाहीक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.45) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vāhīka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Vahikā.—(LP), an account book. Note: vahikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vāhīka (वाहीक).—a S That carries or bears.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vāhika (वाहिक).—

1) A large drum.

2) A car drawn by oxen.

3) A carrier of loads.

Derivable forms: vāhikaḥ (वाहिकः).

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Vāhīka (वाहीक).—See बाहीक (bāhīka) One behaving irreligiously; मलं पृथिव्या वाहीकाः (malaṃ pṛthivyā vāhīkāḥ) Mb.12.328.2;8.44.25.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vāhika (वाहिक).—(-vāhika) (Sanskrit vāhin plus -ka), carrying, carrier, in lekha-v°: dārakas tena lekha-vāhika-manuṣyeṇa sārdhaṃ …gataḥ Divy 258.13.

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Vāhikā (वाहिका).—(manner of) carrying: (tā dāni antaḥpurikā tena sārdhaṃ viśvastaṃ krīḍanti keliṃ) kurvanti, pṛṣṭhi- maṃ (? see this) āruhitvā nānāvāhikāye vāhenti Mv ii.479.19, the harem-women…carried him, when he had mounted on their backs (in amorous sport), in various ways-of-carrying; or possibly, in the manner of various vehicles. Acc. to Cappeller, HOS 15, Glossar, vāhikā means Reihenfolge, das Nacheinander, Kir. 15.25; nānā- makes it difficult to understand it so here (but perhaps not impos- sible; variously taking turns in the sport?).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vāhika (वाहिक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A large drum. 2. A car, &c., drawn by oxen. E. vah to bear, ika aff.

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Vāhīka (वाहीक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) 1. Of burthen, bearing burthens. 2. Outer, external. m.

(-kaḥ) The name of a country, part of the Punjab. E. vāha bearing, or vahir external, aff. īkak or īkan, form irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vahikā (वहिका):—[from vah] See rāja-v.

2) Vāhika (वाहिक):—[from vāh] m. ([from] vāha) a car or vehicle drawn by oxen, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a large drum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a carrier, [Divyāvadāna]

5) [v.s. ...] ([plural]) Name of a people, [Mahābhārata]

6) [v.s. ...] n. Asa Foetida, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (in the two last meanings [probably] [wrong reading] for bālhika or bālhīka).

7) Vāhīka (वाहीक):—[from vāh] See bāhīka.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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