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Vadi, aka: Vādi, Vādī; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vadi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Vādī (वादी, “sonant”) is an alternative spelling for vādin, which refers to one of the four classes of musical notes (svara), according to the Nāṭyaśāstrahapter chapter 28. Accordingly, “that which is an aṃśa-svara (‘chief-note’) anywhere, will in this connexion, be called there Sonant (vādin)”. The sonant note is the melodic centre of the melody.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Vādī (वादी, “sonant”).—“The sonant (vādī) is the king of notes”. (Saṅgītamakaranda 2.7) Besides the tonic (the Sa), always fixed, each rāga has a predominant note from which all variations begin and in which they end: it is always accentuated and bears long pauses. This main note is called vādī (that which speaks). The expression of the vādī is the predominant expression of the rāga: itscharacter determines the mood.

“The chief element in which the power lies of bringing out a particular mood, a rāga, is the sonant (vādī)”. (Saṅgītadarpaṇa 1.68)

“The sonant (vādī) is the note most used while playing; itis the king (of the melody)”. (Rāgavibodha 1.37) The commentary on the Rāgavibodha adds: “the sonant (vādī), being constantly heard, dominates the melody. Because it explains and heralds the mode, it is called vādī (that which speaks)”.

Source: archive.org: Northern Indian Music Volume INāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Purāṇa

Vādi (वादि).—A son of Pṛthu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 14. 1.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

In Buddhism

Pali

vadi : (aor. of vadati) spoke; said; told. || vādī (m.) one who disputes or preaches some doctrine; speaking of.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Relevant definitions

Search found 11 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Vadi Sutta
There are four kinds of expounders (vadi): those that know the meaning of a passage but not the...
Svara
Svara (स्वर, “interval”).—According to the Saṅgīta-makaranda, “The seven notes, ṣaḍja, ṛṣabha, ...
Anatta
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Samvadi
Saṃvādī (संवादी, “consonant”).—“The consonant is like a minister”. (Saṅgītamakaranda) Correspon...
Baladeva
Baladeva (बलदेव).—According to both Śvetāmbara and Digambara, each Vāsudeva has a step-brother,...
Prithu
Pṛthu (पृथु).—The son of Vibhu, who was the son of Prastotā, according to the Varāhapu...
Vadin
Vādin (वादिन्, “sonant”) refers to one of the four classes of musical notes (svara), according ...
Vibhajja Vada
'analytical or discriminating doctrine' is an early name for the original Buddha doctrine, call...
Anuvadi
Anuvādī (अनुवादी, “assonant”).—“The anuvādī is like a servant”. (Saṅgitamakaranda 2.7) The note...
Sangita-makaranda
Sangita Makaranda ascribed to Narada (7th -9th century) is an interesting work. It has two...
Sthayin
Sthāyin (स्थायिन्) refers to the first of four stages through which a rāga (melodic mode) devel...

Relevant text

Search found 26 books containing Vadi, Vādi or Vādī. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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