Utta: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Utta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A thera. He and his friend Dhanuggahatissa lived in a hut near the Jetavana vihara. One night, couriers of Pasenadi, seeking for counsel as to how to win the war against Ajatasattu, overheard a conversation between these two Elders, and acting upon the suggestion contained therein, Pasenadi became victorious (J.ii.403-4).

For the story see Danuggahatissa.

2. Utta. See Datta (Mantidatta).

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Utta.—(LP), modification of Sanskrit putra. Note: utta is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

utta : (pp. of vadati) (= vutta); spoken; uttered. (nt.), utterance.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Utta, (pp. of vac, Sk. ukta; for which the usual form is vutta only as dur° speaking badly or spoken of badly, i.e. of bad repute A. II, 117, 143; III, 163; Kh VIII, 2; KhA 218. (Page 130)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Utta (उत्त).—See उन्द् (und).

--- OR ---

Utta (उत्त).—4 P.

1) To be afflicted or distressed, lose heart, faint.

2) To be uneasy or impatient, be anxious; हृदय मा उत्ताम्य (hṛdaya mā uttāmya) Ś.1; K.85,231,268,275; Māl.3.

Derivable forms: uttam (उत्तम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Utta (उत्त).—[, implied in (duḥkhena) cotto Lalitavistara 133.16; read either cātto = ca-ātto, with ms. A, or cārto = ca-ārto (one ms. cited as cortto); Foucaux affecté par la douleur, which must be substantially the meaning.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Utta (उत्त).—mfn.

(-ttaḥ-ttā-ttaṃ) Wet, moistened. E. und to wet, affix kta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Utta (उत्त):—a See p. 183, col. 1.

2) [from und] b mfn. moistened, wet, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. unna, [column]3.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Utta (उत्त):—[(ttaḥ-ttā-ttaṃ) a.] Wet, moist.

[Sanskrit to German]

Utta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Uṭṭa (उट्ट) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Uṣṭra.

2) Utta (उत्त) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ukta.

3) Utta (उत्त) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Upta.

4) Utta (उत्त) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Gupta.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Utta (ಉತ್ತ):—[noun] a place or region which is neither too far nor too close; (literarally, in between those can be referred to with 'there' and 'here').

--- OR ---

Utta (ಉತ್ತ):—[prepositional] p.p. of the verb 'ಉಱು [uru]' (to be).

--- OR ---

Utta (ಉತ್ತ):—[prepositional] p.p. of the verb 'ಉರು [uru]' (to till, plough).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of utta in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: