Urdhvabahu, Ūrdhvabāhu, Urdhva-bahu: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Urdhvabahu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Urdhvabahu in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु).—A son of Vasiṣṭha. His mother was Ūrjjā. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 20). It is mentioned in Mahābhārata, Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 150, that this Ūrdhvabāhu did penance in South India.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु) refers to “(performed penance with) lifted hands”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] For a hundred years he [Tāraka] performed penance with his hands lifted up [i.e., ūrdhvabāhu], standing on only one leg and gazing at the sun. With his mind steady and firm he observed all sacred rites. Then for a hundred years, the lord and king of Asuras, Tāraka performed the penance: stood steady touching the ground with the single big toe. For hundred years he performed penance by drinking only water; another hundred years by sustaining himself on air alone, another hundred years standing in water and another hundred years standing on dry land. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु).—A sage of the Raivata epoch; a son of Vasiṣṭha and Ūrjā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VIII. 5. 3; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 11. 41; 36. 62; Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 22.

1b) A son of Ūrja and Vasiṣṭha.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 10. 13.
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु) refers to one of the seven sons of Vasiṣṭha and Ūrjā: one of the twenty-four daughters of Dakṣa and Prasūti, according to the Vaṃśa (‘genealogical description’) of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, Ākūti was married to Ruci and Prasūti to Dakṣa. Dakṣa produced in Prasūti twenty-four daughters. [...] [Ūrjā was given to Vasiṣṭha.] From Vasiṣṭha and Ūrjā, seven sons—Raja, Gotra, Ūrdhvabāhu, Savana, Anagha, Sutapā and Śukla and a daughter Puṇḍarikā were born.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Urdhvabahu in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु) refers to “having upraised arms”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, while describing Trikhaṇḍā: “A necklace of divine jewels (hangs) from her neck and (there is) one of forest flowers around her head and a necklace of letters. She has six well adorned arms. O beautiful eyes! There is a trident, dagger, and sword in the right (hands) mirror, club, and skull in the left. (Her) weapon has death as its face and, flaming, it consumes and is hard to bear. The goddess sits in the diamond posture on a lotus below which is a great ghost, terrible in form and frightening. His arms are upraised [i.e., ūrdhvabāhu] and he looks at the goddess’s face. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Urdhvabahu in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु).—a devotee who constantly holds his arms above his head till they are fixed in that position. ऊर्ध्वबाहुर्विरौम्येष न च कश्चित् शृणोति माम् (ūrdhvabāhurviraumyeṣa na ca kaścit śṛṇoti mām) Mb.

Derivable forms: ūrdhvabāhuḥ (ऊर्ध्वबाहुः).

Ūrdhvabāhu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ūrdhva and bāhu (बाहु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ūrddhvabāhu (ऊर्द्ध्वबाहु).—m.

(-huḥ) An ascetic, one who holds his arms above his head constantly till they are fixed in that position. E. ūrddhva and bāhu the arm.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु).—adj. having the arms lifted up, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 1, 3; [Pañcatantra] 165, 16.

Ūrdhvabāhu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ūrdhva and bāhu (बाहु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु).—[adjective] having the arms raised.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ūrdhvabāhu (ऊर्ध्वबाहु):—[=ūrdhva-bāhu] [from ūrdhva] mfn. having the arms lifted up, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā v; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa v; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Bhāgavata-purāṇa etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] a kind of ascetic or devotee

3) [v.s. ...] Name of several Ṛṣis.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ūrddhvabāhu (ऊर्द्ध्वबाहु):—[ūrddhva-bāhu] (huḥ-huḥ-hu) a. One holding up the arms till immoveable.

[Sanskrit to German]

Urdhvabahu in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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