Upanaha, Upanāha: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Upanaha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Upanāha (उपनाह):—Poultice application of these poultice which are prepared by substances which are unctuous, heavy, hot in properties, helps to pacify the vitiated vata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayana

Upanaha is the name of a mahāsiddha, of which eighty-four in total are recognized in Vajrayāna (tantric buddhism). His title is “the boot-maker”. He lived somewhere between the 8th and the 12th century AD.

These mahāsiddhas (e.g., Upanaha) are defined according to the Abhayadatta Sri (possibly Abhayākaragupta) tradition. Its textual origin traces to the 11th century caturāsiti-siddha-pravṛtti, or “the lives of the eighty-four siddhas”, of which only Tibetan translations remains. Upanaha (and other Mahāsiddhas) are the ancient propounders of the textual tradition of tantric or Vajrayana Buddhism.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Upanāha (उपनाह) refers to “hostility”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXXII-XXXIV).—Accordingly, “... Let us suppose that, with or without reason, one hates someone. If one wants to insult him, curse him, strike him or rob him, this is enmity (vaira), If one waits for the proper moment and, given the chance, one torments him with all one’s strength, this is hostility (upanāha). Since maitrī counteracts both these things, it is said to be free of enmity and hostility. Hostility (upanāha) is rivalry. The first offensive movement is of hostility (upanāha). In time, hostility becomes rivalry. When one inflicts torment by means of physical and vocal actions, this is malice”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Upanāha (उपनाह, “enmity”) refers to one of the fourty “conditions” (saṃskāra) that are “associated with mind” (citta-samprayukta) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 30). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (e.g., upanāha). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Upanāha also refers to one of the “twenty-four minor defilements” (upakleśa) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 69).

Source: Google Books: The Fruits of True Monkhood

Upanāha (“grudge” or “spite”) in Buddhism refers to one of the sixteen upakilesa (subtle defilements).

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Upanaha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

upanāha : (m.) ill-will; enmity.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Upanāha, (fr. upa + nah, see upanayhati, same in BSk.; e.g. at M Vastu II. 56. ) ill-will, grudge, enmity M. I, 15; A. I, 91, 95, 299; IV, 148, 349, 456; V, 39, 41 sq. , 209, 310; Pug. 18 = Vbh. 357 (pubbakālaṃ kodho aparakālaṃ upanāho Miln. 289. (Page 143)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Upanāha (उपनाह).—

1) A bundle; देवानां भाग उपनाहः (devānāṃ bhāga upanāhaḥ) Av.9.4.5.

2) An unguent applied to a wound or sore, a plaster, poultice; शोफयोरुपनाहं कुर्यात् (śophayorupanāhaṃ kuryāt) Suśr.

3) The tie of a lute, a peg to which the strings of a lyre are attached and by which they are tightened.

4) Inflammation of the ciliary glands, stye.

Derivable forms: upanāhaḥ (उपनाहः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Upanāha (उपनाह).—m. (= Pali id.), hatred, malice; follows krodha: Mahāvyutpatti 1962 = Tibetan (ḥ)khon du ḥdzin pa (after krodha, before mrakṣa); Dharmasaṃgraha 30 (one of 40 cittasaṃ- prayuktasaṃskārāḥ); 69, list of 24 upakleśa begins krodha, upanāha, mrakṣa; these three also listed Karmavibhaṅga (and Karmavibhaṅgopadeśa) 37.19; kleśopakleśāṃ (for °śān) krodhopanāhādīn Bodhisattvabhūmi 144.5; krodhopanāha as [compound] also Mahāvastu ii.56.1; Daśabhūmikasūtra 18.3; 25.3; neg. anupanāho (= Pali id.; non-hatred) dharmālokamu- khaṃ Lalitavistara 32.19.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upanāha (उपनाह).—m.

(-haḥ) 1. A plaster, an unguent applied to a wound or sore. 2. The tie of a lute, the lower part of the tail piece where the wires are fixed. 3. Inflammation of the ciliary glands, stye. E. upa, nah to bind, ghañ aff.

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Upānaha (उपानह).—f. (-nat) A shoe. E. upa and āṅ before nah to bind, aff. kvip.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upanāha (उपनाह):—[=upa-nāha] [from upa-nah] m. a bundle, [Atharva-veda ix, 4, 5; Taittirīya-saṃhitā]

2) [v.s. ...] a plaster, unguent (applied to a wound or sore)

3) [v.s. ...] a cover, poultice, [Suśruta]

4) [v.s. ...] inflammation of the ciliary glands, stye, [Suśruta]

5) [v.s. ...] the tie of a lute (the lower part of the tail-piece where the wires are fixed), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] continual enmity, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Upānaha (उपानह):—[=upā-naha] [from upā-nah] m. (in [compound]) = upā-nah, [Mahābhārata; Pāṇini 5-4, 107.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upanāha (उपनाह):—[upa-nāha] (haḥ) 1. m. A plaster; the tie of a lute; a stye.

[Sanskrit to German]

Upanaha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Upanāha (ಉಪನಾಹ):—

1) [noun] a number of things tied, wrapped or otherwise held together; a bundle.

2) [noun] the peg of a Veeṇa (the Indian lute) to which the strings are attached and by which they are tightened or loosened.

3) [noun] a kind of medicinal ointment applied to a wound or sore.

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Upānaha (ಉಪಾನಹ):—[noun] = ಉಪಾನತಿ [upanati].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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