Upakarin, Upakārin, Upakārī, Upakari: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Upakarin means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Upakarin in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Upakārī (उपकारी) refers to “one who helps (others)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.26 (“Pārvatī-Jaṭila dialogue”).—Accordingly, as Śiva (in guise of a Brahmacārin) said to Pārvatī: “I am an aged Brahmin roaming about as I please. I am an intelligent ascetic bestowing happiness and helping others [i.e., upakārinsukhado'nyeṣāmupakārī]. Who are you? What is your parentage? Why do you perform penance in this isolated forest? Your penance cannot be surpassed even by the sages of eminent status. You are neither a small girl nor an old woman. You appear to be an auspicious young woman. How is it that you are performing this penance even when you are unmarried. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

1. Upakari - A city of the Pancalas (J.vi.448, 450, 458, 459). Here was the entrance to the tunnel through which King Vedeha escaped to Mithila, as related in the Maha Ummagga Jataka (q.v.).

2. Upakari - A city where Sumedha Buddha preached to a large concourse of people. BuA.165.

 

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Upakarin in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

upakari : (aor. of upakaroti) helped; supported; served. || upakārī (m.), helper; benefactor.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Upakārin, (adj. -n.) (fr. upakāra; cp. ASk. upakārin Jtm. 3142) a benefactor J. III, 11; DA. I, 187; Sdhp. 540, 546. (Page 139)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Upakārī (उपकारी).—a (S) Gracious, that confers benefits and favors. 2 Grateful, that acknowledges benefits and favors. 3 That aids, assists, subserves, promotes.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Upakārī (उपकारी).—a Gracious. Grateful. That as- sists, aids, promotes, subserves.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Upakārī (उपकारी).—

1) Protectress, a female assistant.

2) A palace.

3) A tent, a caravansera.

4) A kind of cake.

See also (synonyms): upakārikā.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Upakārin (उपकारिन्).—a. Helping, serving, beneficial &c.; subservient, benefactor.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upakārin (उपकारिन्).—mfn. (-rī-riṇī-ri) 1. Helping, assisting, a benefactor. 2. Subsidiary, subservient. E. upakāra and ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upakārī (उपकारी).—f. (-rī) A palace, a caravansera. E. upakāra aid, asylum, affixes aṇ and ṅīp.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upakārin (उपकारिन्).—i. e. upa-kṛ + in, adj., f. iṇī. 1. Benefitting; a benefactor. 2. Supporting.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upakārī (उपकारी):—[=upa-kārī] [from upa-kāra > upa-kṛ] f. a royal tent

2) [v.s. ...] a palace

3) [v.s. ...] a caravansery, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upakārin (उपकारिन्):—[=upa-kārin] [from upa-kṛ] mfn. helping, assisting, doing a favour

2) [v.s. ...] a benefactor

3) [v.s. ...] subsidiary, subservient, requisite, [Mahābhārata; Pañcatantra; Śakuntalā; Vedāntasāra etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upakārin (उपकारिन्):—[upa-kārin] (rī-riṇī-ri) a. Aiding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upakārī (उपकारी):—[upa-kārī] (rī) 3. f. A palace; a caravanseray. Also upakāryyā 1. f.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Upakārin (उपकारिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Uaāri, Uvagāri, Uvayāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Upakarin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Upakarin in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Upakārī (उपकारी) [Also spelled upkari]:—(a) beneficial; favourable; helping, obliging; (nm) a benefactor.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Upakāri (ಉಪಕಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] a person who helps others (in need); a benefactor.

2) [noun] ಉಪಕಾರಿಯಾಗು [upakariyagu] upakāriyāgu to become a benefactor; to help; to favour.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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