Upagata, Upāgata: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Upagata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Upāgata (उपागत) refers to “that which comes about”, according to the Kularatnoddyota, one of the earliest Kubjikā Tantras.—Accordingly: “[...] In this way, all embodied beings will be destroyed up to the Great Age. When the end of the merger of Brahmā, Upendra, and Mahendra comes about (upāgata), the Siddhas born of the Śrīkula will assume the nature of pure consciousness. Most excellent in every respect, (these Siddhas) will not be destroyed when the time comes of universal destruction. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Upāgata (उपागत) refers to “enduring (excessive heat and distress)” (as part of severe austerities), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.1 (“Description of Tripura—the three cities”).—Accordingly, as Sanatkumāra narrated to Vyāsa: “O great sage, when the Asura Tāraka was killed by Skanda, the son of Śiva, his three sons performed austerities. [...] Maintaining strict severity in their austerities, the excellent Asuras made their bodies emaciated by their penance. Standing on the bare ground on a single foot, the strong Asuras performed the penance for a hundred years. Taking in only air and enduring (upāgata) excessive heat and distress [tapastepurdurātmānaḥ paraṃ tāpamupāgatāḥ], the terrible and wicked souls continued the penance for a thousand years. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Upāgata (उपागत) is the name of a Śrāvaka mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Upāgata).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Upagata.—(CII 1), same as saṅgata, intimately associated; see upeta, etc. See Ind. Ep., pp. 161 ff. Note: upagata is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Upagatā.—(LP), a receipt. Note: upagatā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Upagata in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

upāgata : (pp. of upāgacchati) reached or attained.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Upāgata, (pp. of upāgacchati) come to, having reached or attained Sn. 1016; PvA. 117 (yakkhattaṃ); Sdhp. 280. (Page 148)

— or —

Upagata, (pp. of upagacchati) — 1. gone to, come, approached (intrs.) Sn. 708 (āsan° = nisinna SnA 495); PvA. 77 (santikaṃ), 78, 79 (petalokaṃ), 123.—2. undergoing, coming or come under, overpowered, suffering Nd2 under asita (= ajjhupagata in same conn. at A. V, 187); Pv. I, 1110 (khuppipās°); PvA. 60 (= abhibhūta). (Page 140)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Upagata (उपगत).—p. p.

1) Gone to, approached, arrived.

2) Occurred, happened.

3) Near, at hand.

4) Got, obtained.

5) Undergone, experienced.

6) Furnished with; (sahita, yukta); जहार स शिरस्त्राणं कुण्डलोपगतं शिरः (jahāra sa śirastrāṇaṃ kuṇḍalopagataṃ śiraḥ) Rām.6.97.32.

7) Gone to, become.

8) Promised, agreed.

9) Passed away, dead.

1) Feeling, suffering (actively used).

-tam 1 Wealth acquired.

2) Receipt; धनी वोपगतं दद्यात् स्वहस्तपरिचिह्नितम् (dhanī vopagataṃ dadyāt svahastaparicihnitam) Y.2.93.

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Upāgata (उपागत).—p. p.

1) Come, approached; तपोधनं वेत्सि न मामुपागतम् (tapodhanaṃ vetsi na māmupāgatam) Ś.4.1. v. l.

2) Occurred, happened.

3) Promised.

4) Suffering, feeling, enduring.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upagata (उपगत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Promised, agreed. 2. Near, approached, gone to. 3. Feeling, suffering, entertaining. 4. Becoming, being, become. 5. Having, obtained. E. upa with, gata gone, part. past of gam to go. [Pagĕ6-a+ 60]

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Upāgata (उपागत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Suffering, feeling. 2. Promised. 3. Approached arrived. 4. Occurred, happened. E. upa and āṅ before gam to go, aff. kta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Upagata (उपगत).—[adjective] approached, happened, occurred, fallen into or got at ([accusative] or —°); [neuter] receipt, acquittance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upagata (उपगत):—[=upa-gata] [from upa-gam] mfn. gone to, met, approached ([especially] for protection or refuge, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra]), [Mahābhārata; Śakuntalā] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] attained, obtained

3) [v.s. ...] arrived, occurred, happened

4) [v.s. ...] undergone, experienced, [Mahābhārata; Śiśupāla-vadha; Pañcatantra] etc. furnished with, [Mahābhārata]

5) [v.s. ...] agreed, allowed, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata]

6) [v.s. ...] promised, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] near at hand

8) [v.s. ...] approximate, [Vopadeva; cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] passed away, dead, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] n. receipt, acquittance, [Yājñavalkya ii, 93.]

11) Upāgata (उपागत):—[=upā-gata] [from upā-gam] mfn. approached, arrived, come to (for protection)

12) [v.s. ...] entered into any state or condition, subject to, burdened with

13) [v.s. ...] occurred, happened, fallen to one’s share

14) [v.s. ...] promised, agreed, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upagata (उपगत):—[upa-gata] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) a. Promised, having, possessing.

2) Upāgata (उपागत):—[upā+gata] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) p. Come; promised; obtained.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Upagata (उपगत) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Uvagaya, Uvāgaya, Ogaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Upagata in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Upagata (ಉಪಗತ):—

1) [adjective] approached; drawn or came near (to).

2) [adjective] happened; occurred; befallen.

3) [adjective] associated with; joined or combined; engaged;4) accepted; agreed; consented.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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