Unnata, aka: Uṇṇata, Unnatā; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Unnata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

1a) Unnata (उन्नत).—A son of Dyutimat.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 11. 9.

1b) Mountain of Kuśadvīpa.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 122. 53.

1c) (Mt.) a hill in the Sālmalīdvīpa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 33; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 26.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

1) Unnatā (उन्नता, “elevated”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the neck (grīvā), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These ‘gestures of the neck (grīvā)’ should follow the gestures made with the head (śiras). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

2) Unnata (उन्नत, “raised”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the sides (pārśva), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. The sides are one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used to perform certain gestures (āṅgika). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Unnatā (उन्नता).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with the neck (grīvā);—Instructions: neck with the face upturned. Uses: in looking up.

2) Unnata (उन्नत, “raised”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with the sides (pārśva);—(Instructions): The other side [on the assumption of the Nata position] will be Unnata (raised), [because in relation of it] the waist, the side, the arm and the shoulder will be raised. (Uses): In going backwards.

(Source): archive.org: Natya Shastra
Nāṭyaśāstra book cover
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Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

In Buddhism

Pali

unnata : (pp. of unnamati) raised; high; lofty.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Uṇṇata, (adj.) (pp. of uṇṇamati, Sk. unnata) raised, high, fig. haughty (opp. oṇata) A. II, 86; Sn. 702 (an° care = uddhaccaṃ n’āpajjeyya SnA 492); Pug. 52 (= ucca uggata Pug. A 229). Cp. unnata. (Page 130)

— or —

Unnata, (pp. of unnamati. Besides this form we find uṇṇata in fig. special meaning, q. v. ) raised, high, lofty, in high situation (opp. oṇata) Pv IV. 66 (= sāmin PvA. 262); J. I, 71; II369; VI 487; Miln. 146, 387; DA. I, 45 See also unnaḷa. (Page 138)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Mahāsāṃghika (school of early Buddhism)

Unnata (उन्नत) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Unnata is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda
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The Mahāsāṃghika (महासांघिक, mahasanghika) is an early school of Buddhism which split into three sub-schools: the Lokottaravāda, the Ekavyāvahārika and the Kukkuṭika. It is commonly seen as an important foundation for the development of Mahāyāna Buddhism.

General definition (in Buddhism)

Unnata (उन्नत, “bent up”) refers to one of the “twenty form objects” (rūpa) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 34). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., unnata). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

unnata (उन्नत).—n S unnatāṃśa m S unnati f S Altitude (of a heavenly body): opp. to natāṃśa Declination.

--- OR ---

unnata (उन्नत).—a S High or tall.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

unnata (उन्नत).—a High, tall.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Relevant definitions

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Grīvā (ग्रीवा, “neck”) refers to that part of the human body from which the Buddha emitted nume...
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Unna, (pp. of ud, unatti & undati, see udaka) in phrase pīti-vegen’unna “bubbling up with the e...
Bhargava
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