Unmesha, Unmeṣa: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Unmesha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Unmeṣa can be transliterated into English as Unmesa or Unmesha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Unmesh.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष, “opening”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the eyelids (puṭa), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures of the eyelids (puṭa) are supposed to follow the corresponding movements of the eyeballs (tārā). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष, “opening”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with the eyelids (puṭa);—Instructions: separating the eyelids. Uses: in anger (krodha).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष):—Opening of eyelids

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Spanda Karikas (The Divine Creative Pulsation)

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष) refers to aunmukhya—“inclination towards manifestation” (i.e., “revelation of the essential nature of the Divine”), according to (commentaries on) the Spanda Kārikās section 1.—Both Rāmakaṇṭha and Utpala Bhaṭṭa warn that pralaya and udaya are not to be taken as corresponding to unmeṣa and nimeṣa exactly in the order in which they are given in the text but rather in a different order i.e. udaya with unmeṣa, and pralaya with nimeṣa:—“When there is unmeṣa i.e., aunmukhya or inclination towards manifestation, there is the udaya or emergence of the world. When there is nimeṣa or retraction of that inclination, there is submergence of the world”. Kṣemarāja takes pralaya and udaya both ways i.e. in a different order (bhinnakrama) as advocated by Rāmakaṇṭha and Utpalabhaṭṭa, and also in the order as they appear in the text. When taken in a different order, the meaning would be as given above. When taken in the order in which they appear in the text, the meaning would be as given below:—“When there is unmeṣa or revelation of the essential nature of the Divine, there is the pralaya or disappearance of the world. When there is nimeṣa or concealment of the essential nature of the Divine, there is the udaya or appearance of the world”. Both these interpretations are correct. In the first interpretation, the words unmeṣa and nimeṣa are construed with reference to Śakti of Śiva. In the second interpretation, they are construed with reference to the svarūpa or essential nature of Śiva.

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष) refers to the “(supreme) expansion (of consciousness)”, according to the Mahānayaprakāśa by Arṇasiṃha (Cf. verse 182-197).—Accordingly, “The supreme arising of the Wheel of Emanation  has (also) been explained from this, the aforementioned point of view, to be the supreme expansion (para-unmeṣa) (of consciousness) that is incomparable and void of (phenomenal) existence. Those rays of consciousness that, luminous, free of phenomenal signs and limitations are the sole cause of the outpouring of the four levels of Speech, are the best of Siddhas, namely, Khagendra and the rest who, always free of the perception of duality, reside in the abode of the Void (of pure consciousness) in the form of the perceiving subject. [...]”

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष) or Unmeṣamārga refers to the “path of opening”, according to the Devīpañcaśataka, an important source of the Kālīkrama that developed in Kashmir after the Kālī Mata of the Jayadrathayāmala.—Accordingly, “The permutation (of the Transmental) is said to be the Light that precedes the mistress of the Wheel of Rays [i.e., puñjacakra-īśī] (of divine consciousness). [...] (That light) is not the moon, (or) the light of the stars; it is not the light of the rays of (the sun), the lord of the sky, nor is it the brilliance of lightning—nor is it like the beautiful sun (of energy). That Light (bhāsā) is seen in the belly (of consciousness) with the eye of knowledge, that is, in the eye on the path of opening [i.e., unmeṣa-mārga-cakṣus]. She is not seen otherwise. All (things) shine due to her: Fire, Moon, Sun and stars. As the division of Sun and Moon, she bestows the plane of oneness. Thus she is the aggregate (kula) of rays and, ferocious, she is the Supreme One (Parā) who has reached the final end of Kula and devours duality with the Yoga of the Fire of (Universal) Destruction.”.—(Cf. Puñjacakra).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

unmēṣa (उन्मेष).—m S Twinkling of eyelids; a blink or wink. unmēṣa as contrad. from nimēṣa is the movement upwards. 2 Opening (of eyes, a flower &c.) 3 fig. Opening of the mind; getting knowledge, or simply, knowledge (as acquired, pursued, desired).

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

unmēṣa (उन्मेष).—m Twinkling of eyelids. Open- ing of the mind.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष).—

1) Opening (of the eyes), winking' twinkling (of the eyes); प्रत्यग्रोन्मेषजिह्मा (pratyagronmeṣajihmā) Mu.3.21.

2) Blowing, opening, expansion; उन्मेषं यो मम न सहते जातिवैरी निशायाम् (unmeṣaṃ yo mama na sahate jātivairī niśāyām) K. P.1; दीर्घिकाकमलोन्मेषः (dīrghikākamalonmeṣaḥ) Kumārasambhava 2.33.

3) Light, flash, brilliancy; सतां प्रज्ञोन्मेषः (satāṃ prajñonmeṣaḥ) Bhartṛhari 2.114 light or flash; विद्युदुन्मेषदृष्टिम् (vidyudunmeṣadṛṣṭim) Meghadūta 83.

4) Awakening, rising, becoming visible, manifestation; ज्ञान° (jñāna°) Śānti.3.13.

5) The act of increasing, supporting, making strong; addition, expansion; इतिहासपुराणानामुन्मेषं निर्मितं च यत् (itihāsapurāṇānāmunmeṣaṃ nirmitaṃ ca yat) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 1.1.63.

Derivable forms: unmeṣaḥ (उन्मेषः).

See also (synonyms): unmeṣaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष).—m.

(-ṣaḥ) 1. Winking, twinkling of the eyelids, the upward motion. 2. Opening the eye, looking at. E. ut up, miṣ to scatter, affix ghañ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष).—i. e. ud-miṣ + a, m. 1. Opening of the eye-lids, [Rāmāyaṇa] 6, 102, 25. 2. Flashing (of lightning), [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 79. 3. Opening (of buds), [Kumārasaṃbhava, (ed. Stenzler.)] 2, 33. 4. Appearance, [Prabodhacandrodaya, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 118, 4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष).—[masculine] opening (of the eye), expanding, becoming visible, appearance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Unmeṣa (उन्मेष):—[=un-meṣa] [from un-miṣ] a m. the act of opening the eyes, looking at

2) [v.s. ...] winking, twinkling or upward motion of the eyelids, [Rāmāyaṇa; Mahābhārata]

3) [v.s. ...] flashing, [Meghadūta 84]

4) [v.s. ...] blowing or blossoming (of a flower), [Kumāra-sambhava]

5) [v.s. ...] coming forth, becoming visible, appearing, [Śāntiśataka; Prabodha-candrodaya; Bhartṛhari etc.]

6) [=un-meṣa] b etc. See [column]2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष):—(ṣaḥ) 1. m. Winking.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ummesa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Unmesha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Unmesha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Unmeṣa (उन्मेष) [Also spelled unmesh]:—(nm) opening; blooming.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Unmēṣa (ಉನ್ಮೇಷ):—

1) [noun] an opening of the eyes.

2) [noun] the act of blowing up; expansion (of a bud into flower).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of unmesha or unmesa in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: