Ullekhana: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ullekhana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (U) next»] — Ullekhana in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन).—Thrice for Pitṛs and once for gods.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 75. 16.
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context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (U) next»] — Ullekhana in Shaivism glossary
Source: archive.org: Sardhatrisatikalottaragama

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन) refers to “digging the earth” which is prescribed as one of the operations/ preliminary ceremonies related to the kuṇḍa (“fire-pit”), according to the various Āgamas and related literature. Ullekhana is mentioned in the Sārdhatriśati (chapter 6) [using the astra-mantra], Mataṅgapārameśvara (Kriyā-pāda, chap 4), Mṛgendra-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 6), Suprabheda-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 11), Kiraṇa-āgama (kriyā-pāda, chpater 4), Pūrvakāmika-āgama (chapter 8), Ajita-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 21), Vīra-āgama (chapter 41), Dīpta-āgama (chapter 33) and the Svāyambhuva-āgama (chapter 17).

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (U) next»] — Ullekhana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन).—

1) Rubbing, scratching, scraping &c.

2) Digging up; Y.1.188; उल्लेखनेन भूमिः शुध्यति (ullekhanena bhūmiḥ śudhyati) Ms. 5.124.

3) Vomiting.

4) Mention, allusion, utterance.

5) Raising up, elevating.

6) Writing, painting.

7) Marking out by lines (the sthaṇḍila &c. in a sacrifice).

Derivable forms: ullekhanam (उल्लेखनम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन).—n.

(-naṃ) 1. Raising up, elevating. 2. Vomiting. 3. Digging. 4. Seraping, paring. 5. Uttering, utterance. 6. Writing, painting. E. ud before likhi to write, &c. lyuṭ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन).—i. e. ud-likh + ana, n. Scraping, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 124.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ullekhana (उल्लेखन).—[adjective] scraping, painting, describing; [neuter] the action of scraping etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ullekhana (उल्लेखन):—[=ul-lekhana] [from ul-likh] mfn. delineating, making lines, making visible or clear, [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha]

2) [v.s. ...] n. the act of marking by lines or scratches, furrowing, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

3) [v.s. ...] scratching open or up, scraping, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya]

4) [v.s. ...] bringing up, vomiting

5) [v.s. ...] an emetic, [Suśruta]

6) [v.s. ...] mentioning, speaking of [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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