Ulka, Ulkā: 8 definitions

Introduction

Ulka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Ulkā (उल्का, “torch”):—In Hindu iconology (śilpaśāstra), this symbol represents the kindling of the fire, or, enthusiasm for the dharma and enlightenment. It is also one of six items that Agni is displayed carrying. Agni, one of the most important Vedic gods, represents divine illumination

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ulkā (उल्का).—f S Fire falling from heaven; a meteor or falling star. 2 A fire-brand.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ulkā (उल्का).—f Fire falling from heaven, a meteor. A firebrand.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ulkā (उल्का).—[Uṇ.3.42]

1) A fiery phenomenon in the sky, a meteor; विरराज काचन समं महोल्कया (virarāja kācana samaṃ maholkayā) Śi.15.92; Ms.1.38,4.13; Y.1.145.

2) A fire-brand, torch; न हि तापयितुं शक्यं सागराम्भस्तृणोल्कया (na hi tāpayituṃ śakyaṃ sāgarāmbhastṛṇolkayā) H.1.83.

3) Fire, flame; बाधेतोल्काक्षपितचमरीबालभारो दवाग्निः (bādhetolkākṣapitacamarībālabhāro davāgniḥ) Me.55.

4) Name of a grammar.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ulkā (उल्का).—f.

(-lkā) 1. A fire-brand. 2. Fire falling from heaven, a meteor, &c. 3. Flame. 4. Fire. E. uṣ to burn, kak Unadi affix, la substituted for ṣa; or the root is a Sautra root, ula to burn.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ulkā (उल्का).—i. e. probably jval + ka, f. 1. A firebrand, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 75, 51. 2. Fire falling from heaven, a meteor, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 38.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ulkā (उल्का).—[feminine] meteor, firebrand, flame.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ulka (उल्क):—m. Name of a king, [Harivaṃśa]

2) Ulkā (उल्का):—f. (√uṣ, [Uṇādi-sūtra iii, 42]), a fiery phenomenon in the sky, a meteor, fire falling from heaven, [Ṛg-veda iv, 4, 2; x, 68, 4; Atharva-veda xix, 9, 9; Mahābhārata; Yājñavalkya; Suśruta] etc.

3) a firebrand, dry grass etc. set on fire, a torch, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa v; Rāmāyaṇa; Kathāsaritsāgara] etc.

4) (in [astrology]) one of the eight principal Daśās or aspect of planets indicating the fate of men, Jyotiṣa ([Tārānātha tarkavācaspati’s Vācaspatyam, Sanskrit dictionary])

5) Name of a grammar.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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