Ujjvala, Ujjvalā: 11 definitions

Introduction

Ujjvala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Ujjvala (उज्ज्वल) is a Sanskrit technical term translating to “bright, white”, and is used throughout Rasaśāstra literature, such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara.

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Ujjvala (शारद) is a Sanskrit word for a variety of rice (ṣaṣṭika) which is said to have a superior quality, according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The literal translation of the word is “luminous” or “clear”. The plant Ujjvala is part of the Śūkadhānyavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of awned grains”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. Ujjvala is said to be cold, unctuous, non-heavy, promoting the stability of and alleviates the three doṣas.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Ujjvalā (उज्ज्वला) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Ujjvalā corresponds to Capalanetrā. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

1) Ujjvala is also the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) to which Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) assigned the alternative name of Mudrā.

2) Ujjvalā (उज्ज्वला) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (eg., Ujjvalā) in 20 verses.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Ujjvala (उज्ज्वल) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Ujjvala corresponds to Vivudhapriyā, Mālika, Uttaramālikā. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (U) next»] — Ujjvala in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Ujjvalā (उज्ज्वला), daughter of Hāhā, is one of the twelve female friends of Mahallikā: daughter of Prahlāda, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 45. Accordingly, as Mahallikā said to Sūryaprabha: “... my female friends are not only two, but twelve in number, and my father’s brother carried them off from Indra’s heaven... The sixth is named Saudāminī, and the seventh Ujjvalā; these are both of them daughters of the Gandharva Hāhā... They [eg., Ujjvalā] are all heavenly nymphs, born from Apsarases, and when I was married they were taken to the first underworld, and I must bestow them on you, in order that I may be always with them”.

The story of Ujjvalā and Mahallikā was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Ujjvalā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ujjvala (उज्ज्वल).—a S Bright, glossy, glittering, clear and shining.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ujjvala (उज्ज्वल).—a.

1) Bright, shining, luminous, splendid; उज्ज्वलकपोलं मुखम् (ujjvalakapolaṃ mukham) Śi.9.48,47;

2) Burning.

3) Clean, clear, white; उज्ज्वलकाञ्चनकान्तिः (ujjvalakāñcanakāntiḥ) Śi.6.5.

4) Lovely, beautiful; सर्गो निसर्गोज्ज्वलः (sargo nisargojjvalaḥ) N.3.136.

5) Mixed with, seasoned; हिङ्गूज्ज्वला जीरकभद्रमुस्ता (hiṅgūjjvalā jīrakabhadramustā) Mk.8.13.

6) Blown, expanded.

7) Unrestrained, full; स्वातन्त्र्यमुज्ज्वलमवाप (svātantryamujjvalamavāpa) Śi.5.48.

-laḥ Love, passion.

-lā 1 Splendour, brightness.

2) Clearness.

3) A form of the Jagatī metre.

-lam Gold.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ujjvala (उज्ज्वल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Luminous, splendid, light. 2. Lovely, beautiful. 3. Clean, clear. 4. Blown, expanded. 5. Burning, blazing. m.

(-laḥ) Love, passion. n.

(-laṃ) Gold. E. ut much, jvala to shine, ac aff.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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