Udvahita, Udvāhitā, Udvāhita: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Udvahita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1a) Udvāhita (उद्वाहित) refers to a specific ‘movement of the head’ (śiras), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. The head is one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used to perform certain gestures (āṅgika). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

(Instructions): “when the head is once turned upwards it is known as the udvāhita”. (Uses): “the udvāhita head is to be applied in pride, showing height, looking high up, self-esteem and the like”.

1b) Udvāhita (उद्वाहित, “raised”) also refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the breast (uras), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. The breast is one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used to perform certain gestures (āṅgika).

(Instructions): “the breast raised up”. (Uses): “in (representing) deep breathing, viewing some lofty object, and yawning”.

1c) Udvāhita (उद्वाहित, “raised”) also refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the shank (jaṅghā), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10.

(Instructions): “raising (a shank) up”. (Uses): “in movements like quick (āviddha) walking”.

1d) Udvāhita (उद्वाहित) also refers to a type of lying-down posture (śayana); it is a Sanskrit technical term defined in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 12.

(Instructions): “lying down with the head resting on the hand and making a movement of the knee, is called the udvāhita posture”. (Uses): “it is to be used in sports, and on hearing the master’s words”.

1e) Udvāhita (उद्वाहित) refers to one of the thirty-three alaṃkāras (embellishments), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. These alaṃkāras, or, ‘embellishments of song’, depend upon the four types of varṇas, which refers to a specific order of musical notes (svara). They are attached to the songs of seven forms, although not generally used in the dhruvās.

According to the Nāṭyaśāstra, “udvāhita is when in a kalā two consecutive notes ascend, and two such kalās make one unit”.

2) Udvāhitā (उद्वाहिता, “raised”) refers to a specific ‘movement of the waist’ (kaṭi), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. The waist is one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used to perform certain gestures (āṅgika). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

(Instructions): “in raising the two sides of the waist slowly”. (Uses): “in the movement of corpulent persons and the amorous movements of women”.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

1) One of the Nine Movements of the Head. Udvāhita (raised): raising the head and keeping it still. Usage: flag, moon, firmament, mountain, flying things in the air, anything tall.

2) One of the Twenty-four Heads. Udvāhita: raising the head sharply. Usage: saying “I can”, dignity.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

udvāhita (उद्वाहित).—p S Married.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Udvāhita (उद्वाहित).—p. p.

1) Raised, lifted up.

2) Married.

3) Eradicated, pulled up.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udvāhita (उद्वाहित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Raised, lifted or pulled up, &c. 2. Eradicated. E. ut before vah to bear, causal form, affix kta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udvāhita (उद्वाहित):—[=ud-vāhita] [from ud-vah] mfn. raised, lifted or pulled up, eradicated.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udvāhita (उद्वाहित):—[udvā+hita] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) a. Pulled up.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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