Udra, Uḍra: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Udra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Udra (उद्र) is a Sanskrit word referring to the animal “catfish”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Ayurvedic literature. The animal Udra is part of the sub-group named Vāriśaya, refering to animals “living in waters”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

Udra (उद्र)—Sanskrit word for an animal called “otter” (Lutra lutra). This animal is from the group called Kūlacara (‘shore-dwellers’). Kūlacara itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Udra (उद्र) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.48) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Udra) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Uḍra (उड्र) refers to a kingdom identified with Odra, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the sun and moon should begin to be eclipsed when only half risen, deceitful men will suffer as well as sacrificial rites. [...] If the sun and moon should be eclipsed when in the sign of Aries (Meṣa), the Pāñcālas, the Kaliṅgas, the Sūrasenas, the people of Kāmboja, of Odra [i.e., uḍra], of Kirāta, soldiers and persons who live by fire will be afflicted with miseries. If the sun or moon should be eclipsed when in the sign of Taurus (Vṛṣabha), shepherds, cows, their owners and eminent men will suffer miseries”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Uḍra (उड्र) refers to a sub-division of the Mlecchas: one of the two-fold division of men born in Mānuṣottara and in the Antaradvīpas, situated in the “middle world” (madhyaloka), according to chapter 2.3 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“In these 35 zones on this side of Mānuṣottara and in the Antaradvīpas, men arise by birth; on the mountains, Meru, etc., by kidnapping and power of learning, in the 2½ continents and in 2 oceans. [...]. From the division into Āryas and Mlecchas they are two-fold. [...] The Mlecchas—[e.g., the Uḍras, ...] and other non-Āryas also are people who do not know even the word ‘dharma’”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Uḍra (उड्र).—Name of a country; the modern Orissa; see ओड्र (oḍra).

Derivable forms: uḍraḥ (उड्रः).

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Udra (उद्र).—A kind of aquatic animal. (Mar. jalamāṃjara).

-dram Water.

Derivable forms: udraḥ (उद्रः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udra (उद्र).—m.

(-draḥ) An otter. E. undī to wet, and rak Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udra (उद्र).—[masculine] a kind of aquatic animal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Uḍra (उड्र):—m. [plural] Name of a people, [Mahābhārata; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā etc.]

2) Udra (उद्र):—m. (√ud, [Uṇādi-sūtra ii, 13]), a kind of aquatic animal (a crab [commentator or commentary] on [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]; an otter, [Uṇādi-sūtra] and, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]), [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xxiv, 37]

3) n. water

4) See anudra and udrin.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Udra (उद्र):—(draḥ) 1. m. An otter.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Uḍra (उड्र) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Uḍḍa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Udra in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Udra (ಉದ್ರ):—

1) [noun] water.

2) [noun] any of sea carnivores of either Otariidae or Phocidae family, with a doglike head, a torpedo-shaped body, and four webbed feet or flippers that live in cold or temperate waters and usu. eat fish; seal.

3) [noun] any of various furry carnivores of Mustelidae family, with webbed feet used in swimming and a long, slightly flattened tail; otter.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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