Uccarya, Uccārya: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Uccarya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Uchcharya.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Uccārya (उच्चार्य) refers to “having recited”, according to the Mṛgendrāgama Kriyāpāda verse 8.149-150.—Accordingly, “Having lifted up the lokadharmī to [the cosmic level of] the deity he desires, he should cause [this deity’s] qualities to be present in the candidate, or, for those desirous of liberation, [join him] in Śiva. He should establish the [regent] who is at the top of the [respective] path, together with his powers, recite (uccārya) the OṂ at the end of the mantra, and then join [him with the deity], while remaining untouched by unmeritorious [karma]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Uccārya (उच्चार्य) refers to “repeating” (the names of a deity), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.48 (“Description of Marriage of Śiva and Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] Then at his behest, the sages jubilantly performed the holy ablution over the head of Pārvatī. Being conversant with the Vedas he asked them specially to perform this. Repeating (uccārya) the names of lord Śiva, they performed Paryukṣaṇa rite. There was a great jubilation and gaiety, O sage”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

uccārya (उच्चार्य).—a S (Purposed, possible, or arising) to be pronounced or uttered.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Uccārya (उच्चार्य) or Uccāryya.—ind. Having spoken or uttered. mfn.

(-ryaḥ-ryā-ryaṃ) To be spoken, to be pronounced. E. ut before car to go, causal form, affix lyap or yat.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Uccārya (उच्चार्य):—[=uc-cārya] [from uc-car] 1. uc-cārya mfn. to be spoken, to be pronounced, [Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] 2. uc-cārya [indeclinable participle] having spoken or uttered.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Uccārya (उच्चार्य):—[uccā+rya] (ryyaḥ-ryyā-ryyaṃ) a. Capable of being pronounced.

[Sanskrit to German]

Uccarya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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