Tuttha, Tuṭṭha, Tutthā: 12 definitions

Introduction

Tuttha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Tuttha (तुत्थ) is a Sanskrit technical term corresponding to “Copper Sulphate”. It is also known as Sasyaka. It is commonly used in Rasaśāstra literature (Medicinal Alchemy) such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara or the Rasaratna-samuccaya. Tuttha is an ingredient often used in various Ayurvedic recipes and Alchemical preparations.

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Tuttha (तुत्थ) refers to “copper sulfate”, and is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. ‘Copper-sulfate’ is a potent sulfate (synthetic sulfur-based ingredient) of Salt and Copper, used as an antidote for poisoning by phosphorus and is also used to prevent the growth of algae.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Tutthā (तुत्था) or Tulyā is another name for Nīlī, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Indigofera tinctoria Linn. (“true indigo”), according to verse 4.80-83 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Tutthā and Nīlī, there are a total of thirty Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Tutthā (तुत्था) is also mentioned as a synonym for Mahānīlī which is a variety of Nīlī: a medicinal plant possibly identified with Indigofera tinctoria Linn. (“true indigo”), according to verse 4.80-83. Together with the names Tutthā and Mahānīlī, there are a total of eight Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Vaidyavallabha: An Authoritative Work on Ayurveda Therapeutics

Tuttha (तुत्थ) refers to “blue vitriol” and is mentioned as an ingredient of metallic drugs for the treatment of Visphoṭaka and Vraṇa, as mentioned in the 17th-century Vaidyavallabha (chapter 3) written by Hastiruci.—The Vaidyavallabha is a work which deals with the treatment and useful for all 8 branches of Ayurveda. The text Vaidyavallabha (mentioning tuttha) has been designed based on the need of the period of the author, availability of drugs during that time, disease manifesting in that era, socio-economical-cultural-familial-spiritual-aspects of that period Vaidyavallabha.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A lay disciple of Natika who died and was reborn in the Suddhavasa, there to attain Nibbana. S.v.358, D.ii.92.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

tuṭṭha : (pp. of tussati) satisfied.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Tuṭṭha, (pp. of tussati to be satisfied) pleased, satisfied; often combined w. haṭṭha (q. v.) i.e. tuṭṭha — haṭṭha J. I, 19 or haṭṭha-tuṭṭha J. II, 240; cp. tuṭṭha-pahaṭṭha J. II, 240.—Sn. 683; It. 103; J. I, 62 (°mānasa), 87, 266 (°citta), 308 (id.); IV, 138.—tuṭṭhabba (grd.) to be pleased with Vin. IV, 259. (Page 304)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tuttha (तुत्थ).—[tud-thak]

1) Fire.

2) A stone.

-ttham Sulphate of copper, usually applied to the eyes as a sort of collyrium or medical ointment.

-tthā 1 Small cardamoms.

2) The indigo plant.

Derivable forms: tutthaḥ (तुत्थः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tuttha (तुत्थ).—m.

(-tthaḥ) Fire. f.

(-tthā) 1. Indigo. 2. Small cardamoms. n.

(-tthaṃ) 1. A collyrium extracted from the Amomum zanthorrhiza. 2. Blue vitriol, sulphate of copper, especially medicinally considered as an Anjan, or application to the eyes. E. tud to pain, thak Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tuttha (तुत्थ).—n. Blue vitriol, [Suśruta] 2, 13, 2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tuttha (तुत्थ).—[neuter] blue vitriol.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Tuttha (तुत्थ):—n. (m., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) blue vitriol (used as an eye-ointment), [Suśruta]

2) fire, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) n. a collyrium, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) a rock, [Uṇādi-sūtra] k.

5) Tutthā (तुत्था):—[from tuttha] f. the indigo plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] small cardamoms, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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