Trisara, aka: Tṛsarā, Tri-sara; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Trisara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Tṛsarā can be transliterated into English as Trsara or Trisara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Trisara (त्रिसर) refers to a “three-stringed necklace” and is classified as an ornament (ābharaṇa) for the breast (vakṣas) to be worn by males, according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. Such ornaments for males should be used in cases of gods and kings.

Ābharaṇa (‘ornaments’, eg., trisara) is a category of alaṃkāra, or “decorations”, which in turn is a category of nepathya, or “costumes and make-up”, the perfection of which forms the main concern of the Āhāryābhinaya, or “extraneous representation”, a critical component for a successful dramatic play.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Trisara in Jainism glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Tṛsarā (तृसरा) refers to one of the twenty-two fishing methods applied by Saurikadatta, according to the Vipākasūtra (or, Vivāgasuya). Fishing was carried on by a certain class of people to earn their livlihood in ancient India. The fishermen (macchabandhā / matsyabandha) went out to the rivers and ponds early in the morning for fishing with their fishing hooks and nets. This occupation was carried on a large scale by some rich personswho engaged hired labour for fishing. Fish (matsya) was an important food of a large section of the people.

 The methods (eg., Tṛsarā) included roaming in the river on the boat and catching fishes by filtering water through a cloth, by different kinds of nets, by ropes, by diverting water through small water courses, catching fishes in muds, etc. The fishes were brought on boats, piled up at some place on the river side and sent to different places for sale. A large quantity of them were dried up, presumably for being preserved for sometime.

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Triśara.—(SII 2), name of an ornament. Note: triśara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trisara (त्रिसर).—milk, sesamum and rice boiled together.

Derivable forms: trisaraḥ (त्रिसरः).

Trisara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and sara (सर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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