Triphala, aka: Tri-phala, Triphalā; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Triphala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

[Triphala in Rasashastra glossaries]

Triphala refers to a combination of the three fruits, viz, haritaki, amalaki, and bibhitaki. (see Bhudeb Mookerji and his Rasajalanidhi)

(Source): archive.org: Rasa-Jala-Nidhi: Or Ocean of indian chemistry and alchemy
Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[Triphala in Ayurveda glossaries]

Triphalā (त्रिफला, “three fruits”) is the Sanskrit name for a group of medicinal plants, eg:

  1. Āmalakī or Dhātrī (Emblica officinalis),
  2. Vibhītakī or Bibhītaka (Terminalia belerica),
  3. Harītakī (Terminalia chebula).

They are classified as being good appetisers, improving the eyesight and proving beneficial in chronic intermittent fever (viṣamajvara). It was originally composed by Suśruta in his Suśrutasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna XXXVIII, a classic work on Āyurveda. The name is derived from the words tri (‘three’) and phalā, translating to “fruits”. The collection of herbs named Triphalā is but one of the thirty-seven gaṇas (‘sections’) of such groups.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Triphalā (त्रिफला).—The Sanskrit name for an important Āyurvedic drug combination.—Triphalā is the combination of three fruits (harītakī, bibhītaka and āmalakī) in equal quantity. Iti s well known as rasāyana (promoting dhātus), eliminating faces and urine and pacifying all the three doṣas.

(Source): Google Books: Essentials of Ayurveda
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[Triphala in Hinduism glossaries]

Triphalā is a combination of herbs used in Ayurveda consisting of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellirica and Phyllanthus emblica.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Triphala in Marathi glossaries]

triphalā (त्रिफला) [or ळा, ḷā].—f m (triphalā S) The three myrobalans, hiraḍā, bēhaḍā, aṃvaḷakaṭī.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

triphalā (त्रिफला) [-ḷā, -ळा].—f m The 3 myrobalans hiraḍā, bēhaḍā, āvaḷakaṭī.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Relevant definitions

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