Trinetra, Trinetrā, Tri-netra: 11 definitions

Introduction

Trinetra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Trinetrā (त्रिनेत्रा, “three-eyed”):—Name of one of the sixty-four mātṛs to be worshipped during Āvaraṇapūjā (“Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”, or “Durgā’s Retinue”), according to the Durgāpūjātattva. They should be worshipped with either the five upācāras or perfume and flowers.

Her mantra is as follows:

ॐ त्रिनेत्रायै नमः
oṃ trinetrāyai namaḥ.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (T) next»] — Trinetra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र) refers to the “three-eyed” and is used to describe Śiva, in the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.15. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] On arrival there, after paying respects to the lord [Śiva] with great excitement we lauded Him with various hymns with palms joined in reverence. The Devas said: [...] Obeisance to Thee, the three-eyed (viz., Trinetra), the five-faced and the ever-luminous. Obeisance to Thee who hast no cause and who seest all the qualities of the sense-organs”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र).—A minister of Mahiṣāsura. The cabinet of Mahiṣāsura was extremely strong and brilliant. Cikṣura, virile and an expert in military science, was the Defence minister. The great economist, Tāmra, was the minister for finance. Udarka was the Commander-in-Chief and the three advisory members were Bāṣkala, Trinetra and Kālabandhaka. Śukrācārya was the minister for education. (5th Skandha, Devī Bhāgavata).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र).—See Śiva;1 constructed the Puṣpakam.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 27. 69; III. 23. 31; 24. 79; 25. 2; 32. 18.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 129. 36; 130. 12.

1b) The son of Nirvṛti; ruled for 28 years.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 271. 27.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Unmatta, who is a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (eg., Unmatta) has a further eight sub-manifestations (eg., Trinetra), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Trinetra according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Unmatta) having a white color and good looks; he should carry in his hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र) refers to one of the “eight embodiments” (mūrtyaṣṭaka) of Śiva according to the Svacchandatantra 10.1161–1162 where they are identical with the eight vidyeśvaras (lords of knowledge). The eight embodiments are also mentioned in a copper-plate inscription found in Malhar, Chhattisgarh, written around 650 CE.

All these manifestations of Śiva (eg., Trinetra) appear at the borders of various divisions of the universe according to the Lākula system.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Trinetra.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘three’. Note: trinetra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र).—epithets of Śiva; R.3. 66; Ku.3.66;5.72.

Derivable forms: trinetraḥ (त्रिनेत्रः).

Trinetra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and netra (नेत्र). See also (synonyms): trinayana, trilocana.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र).—mfn.

(-traḥ-trā-traṃ) Tri-ocular. m.

(-traḥ) Siva. E. tri, and netra eye.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trinetra (त्रिनेत्र).—m. a name of Śiva, [Kumārasaṃbhava, (ed. Stenzler.)] 3, 51; Mahābhārata 12, 10357.

Trinetra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and netra (नेत्र).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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