Trilocana, aka: Tri-locana; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Trilocana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Trilochana.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Trilocana in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन, “Three-Eyed”):—One of the male offspring from Mahākālī (tamas-form of Mahādevī). Mahākālī is one of the three primary forms of Devī, the other two being Mahālakṣmī and Mahāsarasvatī. Not to be confused with Kālī, she is a more powerful cosmic aspect (vyaṣṭi) of Devi and represents the guṇa (universal energy) named tamas. Also see the Devī Māhātmya, a Sanskrit work from the 5th century, incorporated into the Mārkaṇḍeya-Purāṇa.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Trilocana in Purana glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

1a) Trilocana (त्रिलोचन).—Śiva known in Trayambaka Kṣetra; meditation of.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 22. 47; 131. 35; 266. 36; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 33. 1.

1b) A name of Vighneśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 67.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Trilocana in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Virajā, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Trilocana) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Trilocana in Vyakarana glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन).—A scholar of grammar who has written a small work named अव्ययशब्दवृत्ति (avyayaśabdavṛtti) on the uses of indeclinables.

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar
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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Nyaya (school of philosophy)

Trilocana in Nyaya glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन), a brilliant Naiyāyika wrote Nyāyamañjarī. His time is speculated as about 900 A.D. Though the title Nyāyamañjarī is identical with the title of Jayanta Bhaṭṭa’s great work on Nyāya, the work is different in nature. However, it has given rise to some confusion also.

Source: Shodhganga: A study of Nyāya-vaiśeṣika categories
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Nyaya (न्याय, nyaya) refers to a school of Hindu philosophy (astika), drawing its subject-matter from the Upanishads. The Nyaya philosophy is known for its theories on logic, methodology and epistemology, however, it is closely related with Vaisheshika in terms of metaphysics.

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India history and geogprahy

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन) was an elder brother of Gokunātha Upādhyāya (C. 1650-1740 C.E.): the author of Ekāvalī and Vṛttataraṅgiṇī. Gokulanātha was the son of Pītāmbara Upādhyāya and Umā and grandson of Rāmabhadra. He was the younger brother of Trilocana and Dhanañjaya and elder brother of Jagaddhara.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Trilocana in Marathi glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

trilōcana (त्रिलोचन).—m Having three eyes. An epithet of Shiva.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trilocana in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trilocana (त्रिलोचन).—epithets of Śiva; R.3. 66; Ku.3.66;5.72.

Derivable forms: trilocanaḥ (त्रिलोचनः).

Trilocana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and locana (लोचन). See also (synonyms): trinayana, trinetra.

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Trilocana (त्रिलोचन).—Śiva. (-) 1 an unchaste woman.

2) an epithet of Durgā.

Derivable forms: trilocanaḥ (त्रिलोचनः).

Trilocana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and locana (लोचन).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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