Tridanda, Tri-danda, Tridaṇḍa: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Tridanda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Tridanda in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड) refers to the “three bamboo sticks tied into one carried by a religious mendicant”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 17.39.— Cf. Caudhāyana quoted by Mādhavācārya on Parāśara (chapter 2). The word is variously explained by the commentators. C. P. says, “the mode of life of a Yati or a religious mendicant”. Vidyādhara and Īśānadeva take it to mean “bhāgavatadarśana”. [...] Cāṇḍūpaṇḍita, Vidyādhara and Īśānadeva contrast Tridaṇḍa with Bhasmapuṇḍraka which they explain as Śaivadarśana. [...]

The three sticks (tridaṇḍa) are supposed to represent the control of mind, speech and the senses. Cf. Manusmṛti 12.10, 11. Mārkaṇḍeyapurāṇa 41.22 gives the three daṇḍas as: Vāgdaṇḍa, Karmadaṇḍa and Manodaṇḍa. The identical verse is found in Skandapurāṇa (Māheśvarakhaṇḍa) 55.135, 6 of Kumārikākhaṇḍa.

The word Tridaṇḍa is used in its original sense of “three sticks tied into one” in Jātakamālā (Harvard ed., p. 144); also in Sūtasaṃhitā (Jñānayogakhaṇḍa), chapter VI, which describes the life of religious mendicants, [...]. Cf. Kṣemendra’s Daśāvatāracarita—Vāmanāvatāra, verse 191.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड).—A staff, made of three rods, carried by Vaiṣṇava sannyāsīs who are devotees of Lord Kṛṣṇa, signifying service with mind, body and words.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):—Tripod: three holding pillars of life viz. sattva, atma, sharira

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Google Books: Krishna: The Beautiful Legend of God

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):—The Tridaṇḍa staff consists of three sticks. The Manusmṛti, XII.10, states that ‘the man is called a tridaṇḍī in whose mind control over three things—speech, thoughts and body—is firmly fixed.’

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Tri-daṇḍa.—cf. Tridaṇḍin (IA 10); tree staves tied to- gether as borne by Brāhmaṇa mendicants. Note: tri-daṇḍa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड).—

1) the three staves of a Saṃnyāsin (who has resigned the world) tied togethar so as to form one.

2) the triple subjection of thought, word, and deed.

-ṇḍaḥ the state of a religious ascetic; ज्ञानवैराग्यरहितस्त्रिदण्डमुपजीवति (jñānavairāgyarahitastridaṇḍamupajīvati) Bhāg.11.18.4.

Derivable forms: tridaṇḍam (त्रिदण्डम्).

Tridaṇḍa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and daṇḍa (दण्ड).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड).—n.

(-ṇḍaṃ) 1. Three staves collectively. 2. Triple subjection of words, thoughts, and acts; the state of a religious ascetic. E. tri three, daṇḍa a staff, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड).—n. 1. the three staves of a religious mendicant joined together, Mahābhārata 12, 12007. 2. three kinds of self-command (in thought, word, and deed), [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 12, 11.

Tridaṇḍa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and daṇḍa (दण्ड).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड).—[neuter] the three staves (of a mendicant Brahman) or the triple subjection (of words, thoughts, & acts); poss. ṇḍin, as [masculine] a religious mendicant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):—[=tri-daṇḍa] [from tri] n. = ṇḍaka, [Manu-smṛti etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] triple control (id est. of thoughts, words, and acts), [, xii, 11.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):—[tri-daṇḍa] (ṇḍaṃ) 1. n. Three staves collectively; triple subjection, of thoughts, words, and actions.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):—(tri + daṇḍa)

1) n. a) die drei in Eins verbundenen Stäbe eines brahmanischen Bettlers, der der Welt entsagt hat: saptāṅgasyeha rājyasya viṣṭabdhasya tridaṇḍavat [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 9, 296.] saptāṅgasyāsya rājyasya tridaṇḍasyeva tiṣṭhataḥ [Mahābhārata 12, 12007.] dhṛk [?3, 16016. 13445. 4, 1400. 13, 2786. 4505. 4507. 6471. Rāmāyaṇa 3, 52, 9. Pañcatantra III, 238. GAUḌAP. zu SĀṂKHYAK. 50. Prabodhacandrodaja 30, 17.] — b) die dreifache Macht: die Beherrschung der Rede, der Gedanken und der Handlungen [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 12, 11.] —

2) f. ī Titel einer Schrift [Weber’s Verzeichniss No. 1170.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Tridaṇḍa (त्रिदण्ड):——

1) n. — a) die drei in Eins verbundenen Stäbe eines Brahmanen , aer der Welt entsagt hat. — b) die dreifache macht ; die Beherrschung der Rede , der Gedanken und der Handlungen.

2) *f. ī Titel eines Werkes.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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