Trayamana, Trāyamāṇā, Trāyamāṇa: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Trayamana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Trāyamāṇā (त्रायमाणा):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Trayamana in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Trāyamāṇa (त्रायमाण) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “India gentian” plant, a species of plant from the Gentianaceae (gentian) family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. It is also known as Trāyantī. Its official botanical name is Gentiana kurroo and is commonly referred to in English as “Himalayan gentian” and “Indian gentian”. It is a critically endangered plant found throughout the Himalayan mountain range. The literal translation of Trāyamāṇa, is “preserving” or “protecting”. The name Trāyamāṇā could also refer to Delphinium zalil, a perennial plant from the Ranunculaceae (buttercup) family of flowering plants.

This plant (Trāyamāṇa) is also mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers, as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Trāyamāṇā (त्रायमाणा) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Gentiana kurroo Royle” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning trāyamāṇā] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Trāyamāṇā (त्रायमाणा) is the Sanskrit name for a medicinal plant identified with Gentiana kurroo Royle. from the Gentianaceae family of flowering plants, according to verse 5.57-59 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. Trāyamāṇā is commonly known in Hindi as Karu, Kaḍu, Kuṭakī or Nīlkaṇṭha; in Bengali as Karu or Kuchi; and in [J.K.?] as Nīlkaṇṭha, Teeta or Trāmāṇ (Trāmāṇa).

Trāyamāṇā is mentioned as having fifteen synonyms: Kṛtatrāṇa, Trāyantī, Trāyamāṇikā, Balabhadrā, Sukāmā, Vārṣikī, Girijā, Anujā, Maṅgalyāhvā, Devabalā, Pālanī, Bhayanāśinī, Avanī, Rakṣaṇī and Trāṇā.

Properties and characteristics: “Trāyamāṇā is cooling (śīta) and sweet (madhura). It quells gulma (false abdominal lumps due to wind) fevers, vitiated kapha and blood disorders. It controls vertigo, thirst, tuberculosis, exhaustion, poisonous affections and vomitting”.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Trayamana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāyamāṇa (त्रायमाण).—mfn.

(-ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) A preserve, preserving. f.

(-ṇā) A medicinal plant. E. trai to preserve, affix śānac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Trāyamāṇa (त्रायमाण):—[from trāyantikā > trā] mfn. preserving, protecting, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda] etc.

2) Trāyamāṇā (त्रायमाणा):—[from trāyamāṇa > trāyantikā > trā] f. Ficus heterophylla, [vi, 107, 1 f.; viii, 2, 6; Suśruta i, 38 and 42; iv, vi; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā xliv, 10] (ṇa mn.) and, [iil, 39.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāyamāṇa (त्रायमाण):—[(ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) a.] Preserving. f. A medical plant.

[Sanskrit to German]

Trayamana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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