Trasta, Trastā: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Trasta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Trust.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Trastā (त्रस्ता, “frightened”) refers to a specific “glance” (dṛṣṭi), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. This is a type of glance that expresses a ‘transitory state’ (saṃcāribhāva). There are a total thirty-six glances defined.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

A type of glance (or facial expression): Trasta (frightened): inwardly expanded, the pupil raised. Usage: fear and intoxication.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Trastā (त्रस्ता).—A type of glance (dṛṣṭi) expressing a transitory state (saṃcāribhāva);—The Glance in which the eyelids are drawn up in fear, the eyeballs are trembling and the middle of the eye is full-blown due to panic, is called Trastā (frightened).

Uses of Trastā (frightened)—in fright.

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (natya)

Trastā (त्रस्ता) refers to one of the Thirty six kinds of Glances (dṛṣṭi) or “proper accomplishment of glances” (in Indian Dramas), according to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, an ancient Sanskrit text which (being encyclopedic in nature) deals with a variety of cultural topics such as arts, architecture, music, grammar and astronomy.—Dṛṣṭi is very important in a dance form. The appropriate movements of eyes, eyeballs and eyebrows of an artist make the performance more charming. There are thirty six kinds of glances (dṛṣṭi) accepted in the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, for example trastā, belonging to the sañcāriṇadṛṣṭi division.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Trasta (त्रस्त) refers to “terrified”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...] O dear, groups of mad asses ran here and there braying loudly and digging the ground with their hoofs. Terrified by the asses [i.e., rāsabha-trasta], birds flew up from their nests. In their excitement and flutter they honked and cronked. They did not find a peaceful perch anywhere. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Trasta (त्रस्त) refers to the “trembling (minds)”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 22.10cd-13]—“The leader [Śiva] of these [mantras] is eternal, restraining, untroubled, unexpanding, without appearance, and causes protection. He does all, he protects the trembling minds (trasta-cetas) [of those who are afraid of saṃsāra]. He leads. From [Śiva's] leading, [the practitioner] shall attain liberation from great fear. Thus, [the mantra] is called “netra”, because [it] protects. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Mantrashastra (the science of Mantras)

Source: Wisdom Library: Mantrashastra

Trasta (त्रस्त) refers to one of the various mantradoṣa (“defects of mantras”), according to Tantric digests such as the Bṛhattantrasāra (part 4 page 814), Nāradapurāṇa (Nārada-mahā-purāṇa) (verses 64.14-58), Śaradātilaka (verses 2.71-108), Padārthādarśa and Śrīvidyārṇava-tantra.—Trasta is defined as “a mantra that consists of 2, 3, 6, or 8 syllables and ends with phaṭ”. [unverified translation!] The Mantra defect elimination methods consist in performing purification rites (saṃskāra).—See Kulārṇava-tantra verse 15.71-2 and Śaradātilaka verse 2.114-22.

context information

Mantrashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, mantraśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of mantras—chants, incantations, spells, magical hymns, etc. Mantra Sastra literature includes many ancient books dealing with the methods reciting mantras, identifying and purifying its defects and the science behind uttering or chanting syllables.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Trasta (त्रस्त) refers to “trembling”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [as the Nāga-kings said to Bhagavān], “[...] O Bhagavān, when we all stand visibly in front of the Bhagavān, thus frightened and trembling (bhīta-trasta), with the hairs on our bodies bristling, overcome with great dreadful fear, standing all with agitated minds, O Bhagavān, how will monks be in the last time, in the last age, after the Tathāgata has departed? [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

trasta (त्रस्त).—p S Frightened.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

trasta (त्रस्त).—p Wearied. Frightened.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trasta (त्रस्त).—p. p. [tras-kta]

1) Frightened, terrified, alarmed; त्रस्तैकहायनकुरङ्गविलोलदृष्टिः (trastaikahāyanakuraṅgaviloladṛṣṭiḥ) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 4.8.

2) Timid, fearful.

3) Quick, rolling.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trasta (त्रस्त).—mfn.

(-staḥ-stā-staṃ) 1. Timid, fearful. 2. Frighted, alarmed. 3. Quick. E. tras to fear, affix kta; also trasnu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Trasta (त्रस्त):—[from trasura > tras] mfn. quivering, trembling, frighted, [Mahābhārata etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] (in music) quick;

3) [v.s. ...] [Latin] tristis.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trasta (त्रस्त):—[(staḥ-stā-staṃ) a.] Timid, fearful.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Trasta (त्रस्त) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ḍaria, Taṭṭha, Tattha, Tasia.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Ṭrasṭa (ट्रस्ट) [Also spelled trust]:—(nf) a trust; [ṭrasṭī] a trustee.

2) Trasta (त्रस्त) [Also spelled trast]:—(a) frightened, scared, terrified.

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Trasta (ತ್ರಸ್ತ):—

1) [adjective] filled with fear or apprehension; afraid.

2) [adjective] affected by anxiety; anxious.

--- OR ---

Trasta (ತ್ರಸ್ತ):—

1) [noun] a man lacking natural courage; a timid man; a coward.

2) [noun] a distressed man.

3) [noun] (dance.) a sentiment of fear or anxiety; a gesture expressing this sentiment.

4) [noun] (Jain.) name of a hell.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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